openmodeller A framework for species modeling Fapesp process: 04/ Partial Report #1 (April 2005 March 2006)

Tamanho: px
Começar a partir da página:

Download "openmodeller A framework for species modeling Fapesp process: 04/11012-0 Partial Report #1 (April 2005 March 2006)"

Transcrição

1 openmodeller A framework for species modeling Fapesp process: 04/ Partial Report #1 (April 2005 March 2006)

2 Introduction The openmodeller project goal is to develop a framework to facilitate the work of scientists in predictive modeling of species distribution. The four year project funded by Fapesp involves three institutions: CRIA (Centro de Referência em Informação Ambiental), Poli (Escola Politécnica da USP), and INPE (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais). This report summarizes the activities carried out during the first year of the project. Objectives and results Most activities during the first year were related to studies and planning and, when appropriate, included prototyping and preliminary integration. It is important to note that an iterative and incremental development process will be used throughout the project. This means that no attempt has been made to produce complete or final specifications. Any specification (and also implementation) will be revised and changed, whenever necessary, during the project lifetime. This approach is especially convenient for complex projects when requirements, architectural constraints, and sometimes the problem understanding may change over time. Below is the list of objectives proposed for the first year, followed by a summary of activities and the main achievements during the same period. General framework activities/studies Evaluation of parallelization techniques and analysis of parallel algorithms for biodiversity data analysis A study and analysis of the current openmodeller library and its performance was conducted to assess the potential for parallelizing part of the processing. This involved studying specific algorithms (such as GARP) and modules, such as the Projection Module, which is processed after any modeling algorithm and is a good candidate for being parallelized. Considering the requirements (high job throughput and parallel processing), a cluster of multiprocessor nodes is an appropriate computational system that will add processing power to openmodeller. Meetings were held with some companies (Sun, Silicon, HP, IBM, Itautec, AMD and Intel) to get information about technical and commercial features of their products. Solutions of clusters with 2 dual-core nodes or multiprocessor nodes and Infiniband network are being analyzed to define the best equipment for the project. A scheduler is necessary to improve the efficiency in executing tasks in a cluster. Some tools are available for that, such as PBS (Portable Batch System), LSF (Load Sharing Facility), Condor and others. A study was carried out with Condor, a tool developed at University of Wisconsin, Madison, as this tool is mature and

3 there are a lot of study-cases around the world. The tools and its concepts were studied; it was installed in four machines at Poli-USP to establish a Condor Pool for task execution. Annex 1 (condor_config.doc) and 2 (ClassAd.doc) describe the mechanism that enables a task to be allocated to an appropriate resource, and annex 3 (sh_loop.test.txt) has examples of tests. Identification of general services requirements to access data and services A series of interviews, hands-on modeling sessions and formal presentations were made with the objective of understanding the process of species modeling. This was very important to identify the present use-cases of the software, some of its bottlenecks, opportunities for improvements, not only from a user-interface point of view (software usability issues) but also from an architectural point of view (data and processing distribution, for instance). Those activities were beneficial for the project researchers, as they helped increase their understanding of the users point of view, and were also important for the species modelers since they had to reflect about their modeling process which sometimes tends to be very heuristic. A document discussing the modeling process, its activities and many issues related to them, such as data and algorithm selection and quality can be found in annex 4 (ModelingProcess.doc). Definition of Services Architecture When the openmodeller project was proposed, a running version of the main library was already being developed as open-source software with its code available at SourceForge. The development was being conducted by specialists from CRIA, University of Kansas, and University of Reading. As both partners INPE and Poli-USP joined the project with the support from FAPESP, they had to study and understand the existing system, upon which the project proposal was made, in order to know its functionalities and structure. This was mandatory in order to propose necessary modifications on its architecture, features, and techniques. As in many open source initiatives, which are largely based on voluntary work sometimes without a clear development process, there was little formal documentation of the project, since the developers usually prefer to work only on the code. One important activity consisted on an in-depth study of the system and on creating some basic documents for the existing code. Reverse engineering techniques were used which resulted in some documents that help understand the software, the overall architecture, and its main methods and classes. Unified Modeling Language (UML) was used and documents that were created include use-case diagrams and class diagram (only the main diagram). They can be seen in annex 5 (openmodeller_uml.doc, partially in Portuguese).

4 The process of installing and configuring the development environment also included documentation. A CD with installation instructions was created, including source-code, libraries and a tutorial of the installation on MS Windows environment (annex 6 - tutorial-windows.doc - in Portuguese). A tutorial on the use of WinCVS to get the source code in a MS Windows development environment was also prepared (annex 7 - openmodeller com WinCVS.doc - in Portuguese). Locality data component Defining a standard protocol between this component and a client interface, including data formats and commands The first step to define a locality data component was to standardize the basic input of locality data. A new interface has been created for that purpose (OccurrencesReader) allowing locality data to be read from simple text files or from TerraLib tables. More documentation can be found in annex 8 (OccurrencesReader_refman.rtf). A prototype to retrieve data from GBIF 1 has also been implemented as part of the new desktop interface, and should soon be included as a new input alternative within the component. Next steps will include the definition of methods to expose available localities (either stored in a TerraLib database or in specific text files) and the broadening of input data fields that will allow usage of data-cleaning techniques. Study of data-cleaning techniques Several data-cleaning techniques have been implemented and studied initially as part of the specieslink project 2 which is one of the main sources of species occurrences data. This work continued with the openmodeller project which also benefits from high quality data. Data tests directly related to locality attributes include: Geographic error detection: o Check that coordinates are consistent with the administrative regions provided by the original records o Check that coordinates are consistent with the species habitat (marine/terrestrial) Elevation error detection: o Check that coordinates correspond to an elevation consistent with data provided by the original records Itinerary error detection: 1 2

5 o When records are associated to an individual (such as a collector) check that all points from the same individual are geographically consistent with the original collecting dates Geographic outlier detection: o Detect outliers on latitude and longitude using a statistical method based on reverse-jackknifing procedure. A data-cleaning framework called Data Tester 3 was developed by CRIA and is a strong candidate to be used by the locality component. Since the framework was written in a different language (Java), we are currently considering the possibility of creating a protocol to make remote invocations to a data-cleaning service. Data Tester is a recent initiative, but there are good chances for other projects to adopt it, which would certainly increase the number of available tests that could be used by the locality component. It also makes more sense for some tests (like the geographic error detection) to be run on servers that could use a library of layers. Remote interaction between the locality component and a data-cleaning service will be considered during the next steps. Environmental data component Defining a standard protocol between this component and a client interface, including data formats and commands The first step towards an environmental data component was to standardize input and output of environmental data regarding the interaction with the modeling component. This was achieved by creating a new Raster interface with two initial implementations: a GDAL adapter and a TerraLib adapter. GDAL 4 is a translator library for raster geospatial formats 5 and TerraLib 6 is a library of GIS classes and functions that can also store rasters on relational databases. The new Raster interface makes it possible for openmodeller to read and write raster objects using both adapters. More documentation can be found in annex 9 (Raster_refman.rtf). Next steps will include the definition and adoption of metadata for environmental layers and the corresponding methods to advertise which layers are available. New ways to search and retrieve remote layers should also be investigated. Access to local data using TerraLib The original objective for the first year was to propose a way of integrating openmodeller with TerraLib, so that the two environments complement each other. OpenModeller doesn t have access to technologies that are usually found

6 in GIS, for instance interaction with complex geographical databases and geoprocessing algorithms. On the other hand TerraLib has the tools to manage data in geographical databases using a set of spatial and spatio-temporal data structures; it also provides a set of spatial statistics algorithms, image processing algorithms and functions to execute map algebra. Integration is a technique that combines software components in order to generate more complex systems. This technique is an efficient form of software project, saving time and resources, and enabling the use of specialized tools in each area of the wider project. The openmodeller source code was studied and an architecture specification to integrate the two environments was proposed considering the following aspects: a) to impose minimum impact on both libraries; b) to allow the addition of new functionalities as the project develops (scalability). The proposed architecture uses a TerraLib database for information exchange between both environments. This feature also enables close coupling with other TerraLib based programs such as TerraView GIS or TerraWeb web application. An initial version of the OM+TerraLib environment was built. This version allows processing of request files using environmental maps and occurrence data stored in a TerraLib database. Resulting maps can also be stored in a TerraLib database. A technical report about this integration task can be found in annex 10 (TerraLib-openModeller_r1.doc, in Portuguese). Pre-analysis component Study of and testing pre-analysis tools In order to increase model accuracy and improve performance during model creation, a series of pre-processing tools have been identified as potential candidates for being implemented. Data-cleaning techniques can also be seen as a pre-processing step, but were omitted here (see previous section Study of data-cleaning techniques ). Recent studies being carried out by CRIA (Koch, I., unpublished) show that different sets of input layers may give completely different results. This clearly suggests the implementation of pre-processing techniques to cross reference occurrence points with environmental values and determine which layers can better explain the distribution of a particular species. Such techniques include PCA (Principal Components Analysis) and correlation tests. Other pre-processing techniques like sub-sampling locality data into test and training datasets are widely used by data modelers and should definitely be implemented as part of the project to facilitate testing models that are generated. This scenario anticipates a clear relationship between pre and post processing components. Bootstrapping analysis requiring re-sampling of locality data was also suggested.

7 Providing ways to visualize occurrence points from both the geographical and environmental viewpoints can also be important to check if the current samples are widely or poorly distributed in the region of interest. The initial proposal for doing this considering the environmental dimensions is to develop a means of estimating the basic niche conditions, therefore providing a reference to measure how spread or concentrated are the occurrence points. Next steps include the identification of common aspects between all these techniques to specify a standard way of interacting with this component and then implement the first prototypes. Modeling component Defining a standard protocol between this component and a client interface, including data formats and commands In the first year of the project, six openmodeller releases were made (a change log can be found in annex 11 - ChangeLog.txt). Since its initial version, many changes were made to the main controller class (OpenModeller) to enable model projection in different scenarios and also model serialization. The original design has been gradually changed by exposing other internal classes related to sampling, environment layers, and locality points. The C++ API to interact with clients is now considered stable, including methods to retrieve algorithms metadata, to set parameters (input and output layers, input and output masks, localities data, output format, algorithm, and algorithm parameters), to create models, to project models generating distribution maps, and to serialize and deserialize models. The complete client API, including methods and data formats, can be found in annex 12 (OpenModeller_refman.rtf). Additional documentation for the whole component is available online 7. This API is currently used by a console interface, a graphical user interface (see section Desktop Interface ), a Python wrapper, and a SOAP interface for remote jobs. The current algorithm API (classes AlgorithmImpl, AlgMetadata and AlgParameter) tries to abstract the canonical modeling approach and includes methods for initialization, model computation based on environmental values at all occurrence points, iteration, probability calculation at specific environmental conditions, serialization, deserialization, and metadata retrieval. Integration with GSL (GNU Scientific Library) also enables algorithm writers to make use of a broad range of mathematical functions 8. Adaptive Technology applied in modeling As to the use of adaptive techniques for creating new algorithms, subsystems have been identified and changed so that the resulting algorithm can become 7 8

8 adaptive, and the needed modifications can be performed. Specifically in the Garp class, mutate and mutatecrossover methods were studied in order to insert an adaptive mechanism into their basic logic. After that, adaptive equivalent versions were designed. The implementation is expected for the second year of the project. As another result of our study, the exact point in which calls to any new algorithms are to be inserted has been identified in the original source-code, namely the AlgoAdapterModelImpl constructor of the AlgoAdapterModelImpl class. This kind of change in the source-code will take place as soon as operational versions of the new algorithms are available. Changes in genetic operators were designed to include Adaptive Decision Tables, as a mechanism of control of genetic information to be manipulated. As a partial result of this work, adaptive versions of the genetic operators of Crossover and Mutation are being designed. A paper is also being prepared (annex 13 - GECC02007.pdf). Post-analysis component Studying and testing post-analysis tools A wide range of post-processing techniques have been identified as potential candidates to be implemented. These include: Validation of model results (used with the pre-processing component). Algorithm comparison (part of a post-doctoral scholarship work plan under analysis). Hotspot analysis (a distribution map aggregator). Extinction risk analysis (considering distribution maps for different time scenarios). Methods for describing and exploring reasons for distribution. Methods for tuning parameters settings (comparing the effects of different parameter values in model results as a way to discover general criteria for choosing optimal parameter values). Next steps include the identification of common aspects between all these techniques to specify a standard way of interacting with this component and then implement the first prototypes. Desktop Interface During the last year, releases and of the existing openmodeller graphical user interface were made, including improvements and bug fixes. Although the existing interface has been a successful step toward making the library widely accessible to the general public, it became clear that it only

9 covered the basic needs of researchers through a wizard-like interface - a stepby-step process for running simple modeling experiments 9. Within the scope of the project, a new strategy was conceived in order to create a more advanced and comprehensive graphical user interface that will enable researchers to carry out complex experiments involving multiple species, multiple algorithms, different environment scenarios, pre and post processing tools, and other features. An initial list of requirements has been prepared in collaboration with the BiodiversityWorld project researchers, as well as the first mock-ups 10. The current strategy is to make a last release during the next weeks using the existing code base, where multi-species modeling is already implemented. At the same time, a next GUI generation of openmodeller is under work using Qt4 instead of Qt3 (Qt 11 is the graphical library being used by the interface). This new major version will be an intermediary step to reach the final and advanced version, and it will serve as a test bed for the new openmodeller components. This intermediary version includes a locality data component capable of getting local data from text files and retrieving remote data from GBIF servers. An initial version for a simple environmental data component will also be able to show both local and remote map directories. A modeling adapter will enable usage of either a local openmodeller instance or a remote openmodeller server (potentially making use of a cluster). Initial implementations of additional tools for postprocessing analysis like producing hotspots maps are also being developed. This new interface is under active work and its first release is planned for July By that time, when most changes in Qt4 will be assimilated and a greater understanding of the new openmodeller framework components will be achieved, a third and final generation of graphical user interface will follow. This should be the advanced interface addressing all necessary requirements and making the final integration between all framework components. Interaction with different GIS should also be possible through a common plug-in adapter. It is important to mention that a considerable part from both previous code bases will be reused (the wizard interface will remain an option for new users, and the initial versions of framework components that were developed in the intermediary generation will be improved to gain full functionality). Web Interface eenshota.png 11

10 A first prototype for an openmodeller web interface has been developed 12. This interface has access control (also depends on prior user registration on the server side) and it currently enables users to: Create and run new modeling jobs Display job status List all jobs created by the user Delete jobs Visualize distribution maps through the web Save distribution maps as local files This interface was developed using Perl scripts and is initially making use of the openmodeller command line tool (om_console). To run a new job, users follow a step by step process specifying each parameter. The list of algorithms and their respective parameters are still hard coded. Users can upload text files with locality data and can choose environmental layers located on the server. Additional parameters like masks and projection are selected from pre-defined options. After specifying all parameters, the script builds a request file suitable for "om_console" ingestion and then monitors the process status. A generic mapping application has been developed to visualize maps on the web. This application includes a set of scripts that communicate with a web service. More documentation can be found in annex 14 (mapcria.doc). When the new framework components are fully implemented, the idea is to wrap them using SWIG 13 to make their functionality directly available from scripting languages like Python, Perl and PHP. Although it is also possible to build C++ CGI programs, those scripting languages are more widely used in the Internet environment. The next versions of this interface will therefore import specific modules generated by SWIG and then interact directly with each framework component. Study Cases According to the project timeline proposed, study cases were planned to initiate in the second year to test and improve the framework and also to prove the concept. They included testing different environmental data to achieve better results and optimize modeling procedures; testing different algorithms to analyze which are the best for what combination of data and species; applying knowledge from modeling in techniques that help conservation of species and in the recuperation of degraded areas; and developing modeling techniques for species with very few occurrence data. CRIA and INPE have interest in case studies in the Cerrado, Amazon, São Paulo State and in the Iriri area of Xingu. 12 (login: guest password: guest) 13

11 A research schedule is under preparation to enable the development of Study Cases. The main activities developed during the first year were: A research proposal to assess sensitivity of species distribution models (SDM) to different precisions in the geographic position of occurrence data: Modeling algorithms implemented in openmodeller, such as GARP and BIOCLIM, and other algorithms, like ENFA, GLM and Maxent, will be evaluated. Fábio Iwashita s thesis proposition (annex 15 - Iwashita_Proposal.pdf in Portuguese) describes the details. A research project to be submitted as a Pos-Doctoral activity at INPE to study and discuss the relationship between phylogenetic diversity and spatial distribution in the Amazon region: Collaboration with Dra. Lucia Lohmann (USP) will provide access to a Bignoniaceae database containing georeferenced occurrence data for the species (to generate the distribution models) and the cladograms with taxonomic hierarchies (to obtain the phylogenetic diversity indexes). Spatial analysis of the species distribution and the phylogenetic diversity patterns will contribute to the discussion about the biogeographical theories and will provide a new approach to conservation strategies. Cristina B. Costa s thesis proposition (annex 16 - Costa_PosDoc.pdf in Portuguese) describes more details. Development of a geographical database using the TerraLib storage mechanisms to explore the influence of environmental data on the modeling process: Besides the environmental data usually considered for species distribution modeling (and available in the internet) we are including climatic data from CPTEC-INPE, remote sensing imagery, and other maps describing the biophysical environment. Species of Rubiaceae, from the genus Coccocypselum, will be used to test the effects of environmental data on distribution models. We intend to discuss the conservation aspect, considering the genus distribution and diversity, and also regarding the conservation units already established in the Brazilian territory. This activity is already providing data to test the openmodeller-terralib integration. Other relevant activities and results Development of the art package Statistical spatial data analysis and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) can act together in order to understand and model spatially distributed data. Geoprocessing operations can equip statistical models with relevant information which can be used to better understand the main features of usually noisy and multidimensional data. Therefore integration between GIS and

12 statistical software can be highly beneficial for both sides. The package art 14 enables the access to TerraLib from the statistical software called R 15. art encapsulates C++ classes into S4, therefore the user can manipulate TerraLib objects directly in memory using the implemented wrappers. art can manipulate spatial data using the data structures of the sp package, reading and writing Spatial data in the database. Some spatial operations already implemented in the package as part of this project are: Manipulation of points, lines, polygons and raster data; Spatial predicates, such as touches, within, contains, crosses and overlaps ; Polygons operations, as union, intersection, difference and simplification. art is available as source code and also as a cross-compiled Windows binary. Along with the package, there are files documenting the implemented functions and also examples of scripts showing how to use art. Setting up a project portal Although openmodeller's source code is available at SourceForge, there was a need to have an environment for all the project participants to share information, such as presentations, papers, data, project management documents (meetings memos, etc.). The FAPESP s Incubadora Virtual de Projetos (Projects Virtual Incubator) provides an environment for the creation of project portals that can host both public and private content, besides providing many services such as news, calendar, mailing lists, etc. A portal for the openmodeller project was created, after being approved by Incubadora s managers and can be used by all the project community 16. Changes in the original aims For the first year, the project originally proposed to define standard protocols between all components and a generic client interface, including data formats and commands. Unfortunately it was not possible to achieve this for some of the components (especially the pre and post processing components). This was mainly caused by the usual difficulties that happen during the first year of a complex project when setting up a working team and finding efficient ways to collaborate across different institutions. The intention is to achieve these goals during the second year of the project. The study cases originally prioritized the following areas: Cerrado, Amazon region, São Paulo State, and Xingu-Iriri. We are sustaining the same targets

13 except for Xingu-Iriri due to significant difficulties in obtaining reliable species occurrence data for that area. The region of Marajó-Tocantins was chosen as an alternative study site. Workshops On February 2006 all developers were invited to participate in a code fest 17 at CRIA to explore the existing common interests between openmodeller and the BiodiversityWorld project 18. Two representatives from BDWorld attended: Tim Sutton and Peter Brewer. The main goals were to: Review requirements and desirable features for an advanced openmodeller graphical user interface. Produce an API specification for remote invocation of openmodeller jobs. Start implementing the next generation of a graphical user interface for openmodeller. Document the release process for both openmodeller and its GUI, in particular under the Windows platform, and release omgui Familiarize new developers with the openmodeller development environment. The BDWorld project has a Condor cluster already prepared to run openmodeller jobs and is therefore interested in providing interfaces to it. The next generation of an openmodeller graphical user interface will be able to seamlessly run either local or remote openmodeller jobs, opening new perspectives for the scientific community. The same interface should be able to use a new openmodeller cluster to be installed at Escola Politécnica da USP as part of this project. Significant advances were achieved during the meeting, when it was decided to use the SOAP protocol with Document mode and Literal encoding combined with openmodeller serialization/deserialization capabilities. The first prototypes for remote invocation methods were implemented (method GetAvailableAlgorithms) and a full featured version should be released during Publications and Presentations Andrade Neto, P. R., Justiniano Jr., P. R. and Fook, K. D., Integration of Statistics and Geographic Information Systems: the R/TerraLib Case. VII Brazilian Symposium on GeoInformatics, GeoInfo2005. Campos do Jordão, SP, Brazil, Andrade Neto, P. R. and Justiniano Jr., P. R., A Process and Environment for Embedding the R Software into TerraLib. VII Brazilian Symposium on GeoInformatics, GeoInfo2005. Campos do

14 Jordão, SP, Brazil, Bonaccorso, E.; Koch, I. & Peterson, A.T. (in press). Pleistocene fragmentation of Amazon species' ranges. Diversity and Distributions. Chapman, A.D.; Muñoz, M.E.S. & Koch, I Environmental Information: Placing Biodiversity Phenomena in an Ecological and Environmental Context. Biodiversity Informatics, 2, 2005, pp Available at: August, Canhos, V. P., at al., The specieslink Network: practical solutions for integrating, analyzing, sinthesizing and visualizing Biodiversity Information. First Diversitas Open Science Conference, Oaxaca, Mexico, November Giovanni, R., openmodeller: A new tool for fundamental niche modelling. BDWorld Workshop, National e-science Centre, Edinburgh, UK, June Koch, I.; Peterson, A.T. & Shepherd, G. (in preparation). Distribuição geográfica potencial de espécies de Rauvolfia (apocynaceae) e projeções para cenários climáticos do passado. Koch, I.; Peterson, A.T. & Shepherd, G Distribuição geográfica potencial de espécies de Rauvolfia (apocynaceae) e projeções para cenários climáticos do passado. 56º. Congresso Nacional de Botânica, Curitiba, PR, Outubro Koch, I.; Shepherd, G.J. & Siqueira, M.F. (in preparation). Modelagem de Distribuição Geográfica Potencial de Espécies de Apocynaceae no Estado de São Paulo. Meireles, L.D.; Shepherd, G.J.; Koch, I. & Siqueira, M.F Modelagem da distribuição geográfica de Araucaria angustifolia com projeções para cenários climáticos do passado. 56º. Congresso Nacional de Botânica, Curitiba, PR, Outubro Neto, J. J., Bravo, C., Adaptive Version of Crossover and Mutation Genetic Operators for the GARP Algorithm (annex 13 - GECC02007.pdf). Summary and status: discusses a method for obtaining adaptive versions for Crossover and Mutation genetic operators in the GARP algorithm. Paper in preparation to be submitted to GECCO Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference. Santana, F. S., Fonseca, R. R., Saraiva, A. M., Corrêa, P. L. P., Bravo, C., Giovanni, R., openmodeller - an open framework for ecological niche modeling: analysis and future improvements (annex WCCA Presentation Proposal.doc). Summary and status: describes current openmodeller implementation and discusses further improvements. 50% completed. Submitted

15 to and accepted by the 2006 WCCA - World Conference on Computers in Agriculture and Natural Resources. Santana, F. S., Siqueira, M.F. & Saraiva, A. M. (in preparation). Modeling of species distribution based on fundamental niche concepts: the generation of geographic distribution models using openmodeller. (annex 4 ModelingProcess.doc). Summary and status: describes the process of model generation using Open Modeller. 80% completed. Yet to be submitted to a scientific journal. Siqueira, M.F. & Durigan, G. (submitted). Modelagem de Espécies Lenhosas para a Região de Cerrado no Estado de São Paulo. Revista Brasileira de Botânica. Siqueira, M.F., Durigan, G., de Marco Jr, P. & Peterson, A. T. (in preparation). Something from Nothing: Using Landscape Similarity and Ecological Niche Modeling to Find Rare Plant Species. Siqueira, M.F., Durigan, G. & Marco Jr, P. (in preparation) Aplicações de modelagem para auxiliar trabalhos de recuperação ambiental.

16 Annex 01 ################################################################## #### ## ## condor_config ## ## This is the global configuration file for condor. ## ## The file is divided into four main parts: ## Part 1: Settings you MUST customize ## Part 2: Settings you may want to customize ## Part 3: Settings that control the policy of when condor will ## start and stop jobs on your machines ## Part 4: Settings you should probably leave alone (unless you ## know what you're doing) ## ## Please read the INSTALL file (or the Install chapter in the ## Condor Administrator's Manual) for detailed explanations of the ## various settings in here and possible ways to configure your ## pool. ## ## If you are installing Condor as root and then handing over the ## administration of this file to a person you do not trust with ## root access, please read the Installation chapter paying careful ## note to the condor_config.root entries. ## ## Unless otherwise specified, settings that are commented out show ## the defaults that are used if you don't define a value. Settings ## that are defined here MUST BE DEFINED since they have no default ## value. ## ## Unless otherwise indicated, all settings which specify a time are ## defined in seconds. ## ################################################################## #### ################################################################## #### ################################################################## #### ## Part 1: Settings you must customize: ################################################################## #### ################################################################## #### ## What machine is your central manager? CONDOR_HOST = g1.mygrid ## ## Pathnames: ## ## Where have you installed the bin, sbin and lib condor directories? RELEASE_DIR = /usr/local/condor ## Where is the local condor directory for each host? LOCAL_DIR = $(TILDE) #LOCAL_DIR = $(RELEASE_DIR)/hosts/$(HOSTNAME) ## Where is the machine-specific local config file for each host? LOCAL_CONFIG_FILE = $(LOCAL_DIR)/condor_config.local #LOCAL_CONFIG_FILE = $(RELEASE_DIR)/etc/$(HOSTNAME).local ## If the local config file is not present, is it an error? ## WARNING: This is a potential security issue. ## If not specificed, te default is True #REQUIRE_LOCAL_CONFIG_FILE = TRUE ## ## Mail parameters: ## ## When something goes wrong with condor at your site, who should get ## the ? CONDOR_ADMIN = ## Full path to a mail delivery program that understands that "-s" ## means you want to specify a subject: MAIL = /bin/mail ## ## Network domain parameters: ## ## Internet domain of machines sharing a common UID space. If your ## machines don't share a common UID space, use the second entry ## which specifies that each machine has its own UID space. UID_DOMAIN = $(FULL_HOSTNAME) #UID_DOMAIN = $(FULL_HOSTNAME) ## Internet domain of machines sharing a common file system. ## If your machines don't use a network file system, use the second ## entry which specifies that each machine has its own file system. FILESYSTEM_DOMAIN = $(FULL_HOSTNAME) #FILESYSTEM_DOMAIN = $(FULL_HOSTNAME) ################################################################## #### ################################################################## #### ## Part 2: Settings you may want to customize: ## (it is generally safe to leave these untouched) ################################################################## #### ################################################################## #### ## ## Flocking: Submitting jobs to more than one pool ## ## Flocking allows you to run your jobs in other pools, or lets ## others run jobs in your pool. ## ## To let others flock to you, define FLOCK_FROM. ## ## To flock to others, define FLOCK_TO. ## FLOCK_FROM defines the machines where you would like to grant ## people access to your pool via flocking. (i.e. you are granting ## access to these machines to join your pool). FLOCK_FROM = ## An example of this is: #FLOCK_FROM = somehost.friendly.domain, anotherhost.friendly.domain ## FLOCK_TO defines the central managers of the pools that you want ## to flock to. (i.e. you are specifying the machines that you ## want your jobs to be negotiated at -- thereby specifying the ## pools they will run in.) FLOCK_TO = ## An example of this is: #FLOCK_TO = central_manager.friendly.domain, condor.cs.wisc.edu ## FLOCK_COLLECTOR_HOSTS should almost always be the same as ## FLOCK_NEGOTIATOR_HOSTS (as shown below). The only reason it would be ## different is if the collector and negotiator in the pool that you are ## flocking too are running on different machines (not recommended). ## The collectors must be specified in the same corresponding order as ## the FLOCK_NEGOTIATOR_HOSTS list. FLOCK_NEGOTIATOR_HOSTS = $(FLOCK_TO) FLOCK_COLLECTOR_HOSTS = $(FLOCK_TO) ## An example of having the negotiator and the collector on different ## machines is: #FLOCK_NEGOTIATOR_HOSTS = condor.cs.wisc.edu, condornegotiator.friendly.domain #FLOCK_COLLECTOR_HOSTS = condor.cs.wisc.edu, condorcollector.friendly.domain ## ## Host/IP access levels ## ## Please see the administrator's manual for details on these ## settings, what they're for, and how to use them. ## What machines have administrative rights for your pool? This ## defaults to your central manager. You should set it to the ## machine(s) where whoever is the condor administrator(s) works ## (assuming you trust all the users who log into that/those ## machine(s), since this is machine-wide access you're granting). HOSTALLOW_ADMINISTRATOR = $(CONDOR_HOST) ## If there are no machines that should have administrative access ## to your pool (for example, there's no machine where only trusted ## users have accounts), you can uncomment this setting. ## Unfortunately, this will mean that administering your pool will ## be more difficult. #HOSTDENY_ADMINISTRATOR = * ## What machines should have "owner" access to your machines, meaning ## they can issue commands that a machine owner should be able to ## issue to their own machine (like condor_vacate). This defaults to ## machines with administrator access, and the local machine. This ## is probably what you want. HOSTALLOW_OWNER = $(FULL_HOSTNAME), $(HOSTALLOW_ADMINISTRATOR) ## Read access. Machines listed as allow (and/or not listed as deny) ## can view the status of your pool, but cannot join your pool ## or run jobs.

17 ## NOTE: By default, without these entries customized, you ## are granting read access to the whole world. You may want to ## restrict that to hosts in your domain. If possible, please also ## grant read access to "*.cs.wisc.edu", so the Condor developers ## will be able to view the status of your pool and more easily help ## you install, configure or debug your Condor installation. ## It is important to have this defined. HOSTALLOW_READ = * #HOSTALLOW_READ = *.your.domain, *.cs.wisc.edu #HOSTDENY_READ = *.bad.subnet, bad-machine.your.domain, * ## Write access. Machines listed here can join your pool, submit ## jobs, etc. Note: Any machine which has WRITE access must ## also be granted READ access. Granting WRITE access below does ## not also automatically grant READ access; you must change ## HOSTALLOW_READ above as well. ## If you leave it as it is, it will be unspecified, and effectively ## it will be allowing anyone to write to your pool. HOSTALLOW_WRITE = * #HOSTALLOW_WRITE = *.your.domain, your-friend's-machine.other.domain #HOSTDENY_WRITE = bad-machine.your.domain ## Negotiator access. Machines listed here are trusted central ## managers. You should normally not have to change this. HOSTALLOW_NEGOTIATOR = $(NEGOTIATOR_HOST) ## Now, with flocking we need to let the SCHEDD trust the other ## negotiators we are flocking with as well. You should normally ## not have to change this either. HOSTALLOW_NEGOTIATOR_SCHEDD = $(NEGOTIATOR_HOST), $(FLOCK_NEGOTIATOR_HOSTS) ## Config access. Machines listed here can use the condor_config_val ## tool to modify all daemon configurations except those specified in ## the condor_config.root file. This level of host-wide access ## should only be granted with extreme caution. By default, config ## access is denied from all hosts. #HOSTALLOW_CONFIG = trusted-host.your.domain ## Flocking Configs. These are the real things that Condor looks at, ## but we set them from the FLOCK_FROM/TO macros above. It is safe ## to leave these unchanged. HOSTALLOW_WRITE_COLLECTOR = $(HOSTALLOW_WRITE), $(FLOCK_FROM) HOSTALLOW_WRITE_STARTD = $(HOSTALLOW_WRITE), $(FLOCK_FROM) HOSTALLOW_READ_COLLECTOR = $(HOSTALLOW_READ), $(FLOCK_FROM) HOSTALLOW_READ_STARTD = $(HOSTALLOW_READ), $(FLOCK_FROM) ## ## Security parameters for setting configuration values remotely: ## ## These parameters define the list of attributes that can be set ## remotely with condor_config_val for the security access levels ## defined above (for example, WRITE, ADMINISTRATOR, CONFIG, etc). ## Please see the administrator's manual for futher details on these ## settings, what they're for, and how to use them. There are no ## default values for any of these settings. If they are not ## defined, no attributes can be set with condor_config_val. ## Attributes that can be set by hosts with "CONFIG" permission (as ## defined with HOSTALLOW_CONFIG and HOSTDENY_CONFIG above). ## The commented-out value here was the default behavior of Condor ## prior to version If you don't need this behavior, you ## should leave this commented out. #SETTABLE_ATTRS_CONFIG = * ## Attributes that can be set by hosts with "ADMINISTRATOR" ## permission (as defined above) #SETTABLE_ATTRS_ADMINISTRATOR = *_DEBUG, MAX_*_LOG ## Attributes that can be set by hosts with "OWNER" permission (as ## defined above) NOTE: any Condor job running on a given host will ## have OWNER permission on that host by default. If you grant this ## kind of access, Condor jobs will be able to modify any attributes ## you list below on the machine where they are running. This has ## obvious security implications, so only grant this kind of ## permission for custom attributes that you define for your own use ## at your pool (custom attributes about your machines that are ## published with the STARTD_EXPRS setting, for example). #SETTABLE_ATTRS_OWNER = your_custom_attribute, another_custom_attr ## You can also define daemon-specific versions of each of these ## settings. For example, to define settings that can only be ## changed in the condor_startd's configuration by hosts with OWNER ## permission, you would use: #STARTD_SETTABLE_ATTRS_OWNER = your_custom_attribute_name ## ## Network filesystem parameters: ## ## Do you want to use NFS for file access instead of remote system ## calls? #USE_NFS = False ## Do you want to use AFS for file access instead of remote system ## calls? #USE_AFS = False ## ## Checkpoint server: ## ## Do you want to use a checkpoint server if one is available? If a ## checkpoint server isn't available or USE_CKPT_SERVER is set to ## False, checkpoints will be written to the local SPOOL directory on ## the submission machine. #USE_CKPT_SERVER = True ## What's the hostname of this machine's nearest checkpoint server? #CKPT_SERVER_HOST = checkpoint-server-hostname.your.domain ## Do you want the starter on the execute machine to choose the ## checkpoint server? If False, the CKPT_SERVER_HOST set on ## the submit machine is used. Otherwise, the CKPT_SERVER_HOST set ## on the execute machine is used. The default is true. #STARTER_CHOOSES_CKPT_SERVER = True ## ## Miscellaneous: ## ## Try to save this much swap space by not starting new shadows. ## Specified in megabytes. #RESERVED_SWAP = 5 ## What's the maximum number of jobs you want a single submit machine ## to spawn shadows for? #MAX_JOBS_RUNNING = 200 ## Condor needs to create a few lock files to synchronize access to ## various log files. Because of problems we've had with network ## filesystems and file locking over the years, we HIGHLY recommend ## that you put these lock files on a local partition on each ## machine. If you don't have your LOCAL_DIR on a local partition, ## be sure to change this entry. Whatever user (or group) condor is ## running as needs to have write access to this directory. If ## you're not running as root, this is whatever user you started up ## the condor_master as. If you are running as root, and there's a ## condor account, it's probably condor. Otherwise, it's whatever ## you've set in the CONDOR_IDS environment variable. See the Admin ## manual for details on this. LOCK = $(LOG) ## If you don't use a fully qualified name in your /etc/hosts file ## (or NIS, etc.) for either your official hostname or as an alias, ## Condor wouldn't normally be able to use fully qualified names in ## places that it'd like to. You can set this parameter to the ## domain you'd like appended to your hostname, if changing your host ## information isn't a good option. This parameter must be set in ## the global config file (not the LOCAL_CONFIG_FILE from above). #DEFAULT_DOMAIN_NAME = your.domain.name ## Condor can be told whether or not you want the Condor daemons to ## create a core file if something really bad happens. This just ## sets the resource limit for the size of a core file. By default, ## we don't do anything, and leave in place whatever limit was in ## effect when you started the Condor daemons. If this parameter is ## set and "True", we increase the limit to as large as it gets. If ## it's set to "False", we set the limit at 0 (which means that no ## core files are even created). Core files greatly help the Condor ## developers debug any problems you might be having. #CREATE_CORE_FILES = True ## Condor Glidein downloads binaries from a remote server for the ## machines into which you're gliding. This saves you from manually ## downloading and installing binaries for every architecture you ## might want to glidein to. The default server is one maintained at ## The University of Wisconsin. If you don't want to use the UW ## server, you can set up your own (it needs to be running a gsiftp ## daemon) and change the following values to point to it, instead. GLIDEIN_SERVER_NAME = gridftp.cs.wisc.edu GLIDEIN_SERVER_DIR = /p/condor/public/binaries/glidein ## If your site needs to use UID_DOMAIN settings (defined above) that ## are not real Internet domains that match the hostnames, you can ## tell Condor to trust whatever UID_DOMAIN a submit machine gives to ## the execute machine and just make sure the two strings match. The ## default for this setting is False, since it is more secure this ## way. #TRUST_UID_DOMAIN = False ## ## Settings that control the daemon's debugging output: ##

18 ## ## The flags given in ALL_DEBUG are shared between all daemons. ## ALL_DEBUG = MAX_COLLECTOR_LOG = COLLECTOR_DEBUG = MAX_KBDD_LOG = KBDD_DEBUG = MAX_NEGOTIATOR_LOG = NEGOTIATOR_DEBUG = D_MATCH MAX_NEGOTIATOR_MATCH_LOG = MAX_SCHEDD_LOG = SCHEDD_DEBUG = D_COMMAND MAX_SHADOW_LOG = SHADOW_DEBUG = MAX_STARTD_LOG = STARTD_DEBUG = D_COMMAND MAX_STARTER_LOG = STARTER_DEBUG = D_NODATE MAX_MASTER_LOG = MASTER_DEBUG = D_COMMAND ## When the master starts up, should it truncate it's log file? #TRUNC_MASTER_LOG_ON_OPEN = False ################################################################## #### ################################################################## #### ## Part 3: Settings control the policy for running, stopping, and ## periodically checkpointing condor jobs: ################################################################## #### ################################################################## #### ## This section contains macros are here to help write legible ## expressions: MINUTE = 60 HOUR = (60 * $(MINUTE)) StateTimer = (CurrentTime - EnteredCurrentState) ActivityTimer = (CurrentTime - EnteredCurrentActivity) ActivationTimer = (CurrentTime - JobStart) LastCkpt = (CurrentTime - LastPeriodicCheckpoint) ## The JobUniverse attribute is just an int. These macros can be ## used to specify the universe in a human-readable way: STANDARD = 1 PVM = 4

19 Annex 02 ClassAd MyType = "Machine" TargetType = "Job" Name = "g1.mygrid" Machine = "g1.mygrid" Rank = CpuBusy = ((LoadAvg - CondorLoadAvg) >= ) COLLECTOR_HOST_STRING = "g1.mygrid" CondorVersion = "$CondorVersion: Jun $" CondorPlatform = "$CondorPlatform: I386-LINUX_RH80 $" VirtualMachineID = 1 VirtualMemory = Disk = CondorLoadAvg = LoadAvg = KeyboardIdle = 0 ConsoleIdle = 0 Memory = 123 Cpus = 1 StartdIpAddr = "< :1082>" Arch = "INTEL" OpSys = "LINUX" UidDomain = "g1.mygrid" FileSystemDomain = "g1.mygrid" Subnet = " " HasIOProxy = TRUE TotalVirtualMemory = TotalDisk = KFlops = Mips = 2371 LastBenchmark = TotalLoadAvg = TotalCondorLoadAvg = ClockMin = 988 ClockDay = 3 TotalVirtualMachines = 1 HasFileTransfer = TRUE HasMPI = TRUE HasJICLocalConfig = TRUE HasJICLocalStdin = TRUE HasPVM = TRUE HasRemoteSyscalls = TRUE HasCheckpointing = TRUE StarterAbilityList = "HasFileTransfer,HasMPI,HasJICLocalConfig,HasJICLocalStdin,HasPVM,HasRemoteSyscalls,HasCh eckpointing" CpuBusyTime = 0 CpuIsBusy = FALSE State = "Owner" EnteredCurrentState = Activity = "Idle" EnteredCurrentActivity = Start = ((KeyboardIdle > 15 * 60) && (((LoadAvg - CondorLoadAvg) <= ) (State!= "Unclaimed" && State!= "Owner"))) Requirements = START CurrentRank = DaemonStartTime = UpdateSequenceNumber = 3 MyAddress = "< :1082>" LastHeardFrom =

20 UpdatesTotal = 4 UpdatesSequenced = 3 UpdatesLost = 0 UpdatesHistory = "0x "

21 Annex ( ) 02/16 02:35:56 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:56 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:56 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:56 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:56 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:56 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:56 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:56 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:56 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:56 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:56 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:56 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:56 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:56 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:56 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:56 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:56 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:56 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:56 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:56 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:57 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:57 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:57 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:57 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:57 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:57 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:57 Job submitted from host: < :1028>

22 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:57 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:57 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:57 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:57 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:57 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:57 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:57 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:57 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:57 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:57 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:57 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:57 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:57 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:58 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:58 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:58 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:58 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:58 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:58 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:58 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:58 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:58 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:58 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:58 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:58 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:58 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:58 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:58 Job submitted from host: < :1028>

23 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:58 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:58 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:58 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:58 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:58 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:59 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:59 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:59 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:59 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:59 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:59 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:59 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:59 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:59 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:59 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:59 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:59 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:59 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:59 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:59 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:59 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:59 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:59 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:59 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:35:59 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:36:00 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:36:00 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:36:00 Job submitted from host: < :1028>

24 000 ( ) 02/16 02:36:00 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:36:00 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:36:00 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:36:00 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:36:00 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:36:00 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:36:00 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:36:00 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:36:00 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:36:00 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:36:00 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:36:00 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:36:00 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:36:00 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:36:00 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:36:00 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 02:36:00 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 001 ( ) 02/16 02:36:01 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 02:36:02 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 02:36:09 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 02:36:10 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 02:37:01 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 02:37:03 Job terminated.

25 001 ( ) 02/16 02:37:04 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 02:37:05 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 02:37:12 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 02:37:13 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 02:38:04 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 02:38:06 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 02:38:07 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 02:38:08 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 02:38:14 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 02:38:16 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 02:39:07 Job terminated.

26 005 ( ) 02/16 02:39:09 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 02:39:10 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 02:39:11 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 02:39:18 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 02:39:19 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 02:40:10 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 02:40:12 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 02:40:13 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 02:40:14 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 02:40:21 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 02:40:22 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 02:41:13 Job terminated.

27 005 ( ) 02/16 02:41:15 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 02:41:16 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 02:41:17 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 02:41:24 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 02:41:25 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 02:42:17 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 02:42:18 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 02:42:19 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 02:42:20 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 02:42:27 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 02:42:28 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 02:43:20 Job terminated.

28 005 ( ) 02/16 02:43:21 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 02:43:22 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 02:43:23 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 02:43:30 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 02:43:31 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 02:44:23 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 02:44:24 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 02:44:25 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 02:44:27 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 02:44:33 Image size of job updated: 3860

29 006 ( ) 02/16 02:44:35 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 02:45:26 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 02:45:27 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 02:45:28 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 02:45:30 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 02:45:36 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 02:45:38 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 02:46:29 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 02:46:30 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 02:46:32 Job executing on host: < :1027>

30 001 ( ) 02/16 02:46:33 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 02:46:40 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 02:46:40 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 09:55:39 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 09:55:47 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 09:56:40 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 09:56:42 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 09:56:50 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 09:57:43 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 09:57:45 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 09:57:53 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 09:58:45 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 09:58:55 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 09:59:02 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 09:59:56 Job terminated.

31 001 ( ) 02/16 09:59:59 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:00:07 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:01:01 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:01:03 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:01:11 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:02:04 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:02:06 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:02:14 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:03:07 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:03:09 Job executing on host: < :1027>

32 006 ( ) 02/16 10:03:17 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:04:10 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:04:12 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:04:20 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:05:13 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:05:15 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:05:23 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:05:40 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:05:42 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:05:48 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:05:50 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:06:15 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:06:18 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:06:26 Image size of job updated: 3860

33 005 ( ) 02/16 10:06:40 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:06:42 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:06:43 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:06:44 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:06:51 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:06:53 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:07:18 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:07:21 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:07:29 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:07:43 Job terminated.

34 005 ( ) 02/16 10:07:45 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:07:45 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:07:47 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:07:53 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:07:55 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:08:21 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:08:23 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:08:32 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:08:46 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:08:48 Job terminated.

35 001 ( ) 02/16 10:08:48 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:08:50 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:08:56 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:08:58 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:09:24 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:09:26 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:09:34 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:09:49 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:09:50 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:09:51 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:09:53 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:09:59 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:10:01 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:10:27 Job terminated.

36 001 ( ) 02/16 10:10:29 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:10:37 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:10:51 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:10:53 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:10:54 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:10:55 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:11:02 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:11:04 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:11:30 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:11:32 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:11:40 Image size of job updated: 3860

37 005 ( ) 02/16 10:11:54 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:11:56 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:11:56 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:11:58 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:12:04 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:12:06 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:12:32 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:12:35 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:12:43 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:12:57 Job terminated.

38 005 ( ) 02/16 10:12:59 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:12:59 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:13:01 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:13:07 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:13:09 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:13:35 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:13:37 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:13:45 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:14:00 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:14:01 Job terminated.

39 001 ( ) 02/16 10:14:02 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:14:04 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:14:10 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:14:12 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:14:38 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:14:40 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:14:48 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:15:02 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:15:04 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:15:05 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:15:06 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:15:13 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:15:14 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:15:41 Job terminated.

40 001 ( ) 02/16 10:15:43 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:15:51 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:16:05 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:16:07 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:16:07 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:16:09 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:16:15 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:16:17 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:16:44 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:16:46 Job executing on host: < :1027>

41 006 ( ) 02/16 10:16:54 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:17:08 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:17:10 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:17:10 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:17:12 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:17:18 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:17:20 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:17:47 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:17:49 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:17:57 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:18:11 Job terminated.

42 005 ( ) 02/16 10:18:12 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:18:13 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:18:15 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:18:21 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:18:23 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:18:50 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:18:52 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:19:00 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:19:14 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:19:15 Job terminated.

43 001 ( ) 02/16 10:19:16 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:19:17 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:19:24 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:19:25 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:19:52 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:19:55 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:20:03 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:20:16 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:20:18 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:20:18 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:20:20 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:20:26 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:20:28 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:20:55 Job terminated.

44 001 ( ) 02/16 10:20:57 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:21:05 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:21:19 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:21:21 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:21:21 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:21:23 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:21:29 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:21:31 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:21:58 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:22:00 Job executing on host: < :1027>

45 006 ( ) 02/16 10:22:08 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:22:22 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:22:23 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:22:24 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:22:26 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:22:32 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:22:34 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:23:01 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:23:03 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:23:11 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:23:24 Job terminated.

46 005 ( ) 02/16 10:23:26 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:23:27 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:23:29 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:23:35 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:23:37 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:24:03 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:24:06 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:24:14 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:24:27 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:24:29 Job terminated.

47 001 ( ) 02/16 10:24:29 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:24:31 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:24:37 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:25:06 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:25:09 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:25:17 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:25:30 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:25:32 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:25:40 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:26:09 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:26:12 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:26:20 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:26:33 Job terminated.

48 001 ( ) 02/16 10:26:35 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:26:43 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:27:13 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:27:15 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:27:23 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:27:36 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:27:39 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:27:47 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:28:16 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:28:18 Job executing on host: < :1027>

49 006 ( ) 02/16 10:28:26 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:28:39 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:28:42 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:28:50 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:29:19 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:29:21 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:29:29 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:29:42 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:29:45 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:29:53 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:30:21 Job terminated.

50 001 ( ) 02/16 10:30:24 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:30:32 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:30:40 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:30:42 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:30:44 Job executing on host: < :1027> 005 ( ) 02/16 10:30:45 Job terminated. 006 ( ) 02/16 10:30:48 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:30:50 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:30:52 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:31:25 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:31:41 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:31:43 Job terminated.

51 005 ( ) 02/16 10:31:45 Job terminated. 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:28 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:28 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:28 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:28 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:28 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:28 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:28 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:28 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:28 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:28 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:28 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:28 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:28 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:28 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:28 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:28 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:28 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:28 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:28 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:28 Job submitted from host: < :1028>

52 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:29 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:29 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:29 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:29 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:29 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:29 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:29 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:29 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:29 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:29 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:29 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:29 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:29 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:29 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:29 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:29 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:29 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:29 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:29 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:29 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:30 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:30 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:30 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:30 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:30 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:30 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:30 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:30 Job submitted from host: < :1028>

53 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:30 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:30 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:30 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:30 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:30 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:30 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:30 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:30 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:30 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:30 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:30 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:30 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:31 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:31 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:31 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:31 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:31 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:31 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:31 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:31 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:31 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:31 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:31 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:31 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:31 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:31 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:31 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:31 Job submitted from host: < :1028>

54 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:31 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:31 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:31 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:31 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job executing on host: < :1027> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028>

55 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:32 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:33 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:33 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:33 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:33 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:33 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:33 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:33 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:33 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:33 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:33 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:33 Job submitted from host: < :1028>

56 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:33 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:33 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:33 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:33 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:33 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:33 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:33 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:33 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:33 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028>

57 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job executing on host: < :1027> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:34 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:35 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:35 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:35 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:35 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:35 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:35 Job submitted from host: < :1028>

58 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:35 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:35 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:35 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:35 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:35 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:35 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:35 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:35 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:35 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:35 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:35 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:35 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:35 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 000 ( ) 02/16 10:32:35 Job submitted from host: < :1028> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:32:36 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:32:40 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:32:42 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:32:44 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:32:53 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:32:55 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:33:01 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:33:03 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:33:33 Job terminated.

59 005 ( ) 02/16 10:33:34 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:33:35 Job executing on host: < :1027> 005 ( ) 02/16 10:33:36 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:33:37 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:33:39 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:33:43 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:33:45 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:33:47 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:33:53 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:33:55 Job terminated.

60 001 ( ) 02/16 10:33:56 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:33:58 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:34:04 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:34:06 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:34:36 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:34:37 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:34:38 Job executing on host: < :1027> 005 ( ) 02/16 10:34:39 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:34:40 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:34:41 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:34:46 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:34:48 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:34:49 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:34:56 Job terminated.

61 001 ( ) 02/16 10:34:59 Job executing on host: < :1027> 005 ( ) 02/16 10:34:59 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:35:01 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:35:07 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:35:09 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:35:39 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:35:40 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:35:42 Job executing on host: < :1027> 005 ( ) 02/16 10:35:42 Job terminated.

62 001 ( ) 02/16 10:35:42 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:35:44 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:35:50 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:35:50 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:35:52 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:35:59 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:36:01 Job executing on host: < :1027> 005 ( ) 02/16 10:36:02 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:36:04 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:36:09 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:36:12 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:36:42 Job terminated.

63 005 ( ) 02/16 10:36:43 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:36:44 Job executing on host: < :1027> 005 ( ) 02/16 10:36:45 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:36:45 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:36:47 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:36:52 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:36:53 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:36:55 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:37:02 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:37:04 Job executing on host: < :1027> 005 ( ) 02/16 10:37:05 Job terminated.

64 001 ( ) 02/16 10:37:07 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:37:12 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:37:15 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:37:45 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:37:46 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:37:47 Job executing on host: < :1027> 005 ( ) 02/16 10:37:48 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:37:48 Job executing on host: < :1027> 001 ( ) 02/16 10:37:50 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:37:55 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:37:56 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:37:58 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:38:05 Job terminated.

65 001 ( ) 02/16 10:38:07 Job executing on host: < :1027> 005 ( ) 02/16 10:38:07 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:38:10 Job executing on host: < :1027> 006 ( ) 02/16 10:38:15 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:38:18 Image size of job updated: ( ) 02/16 10:38:48 Job terminated. 005 ( ) 02/16 10:38:49 Job terminated. 001 ( ) 02/16 10:38:50 Job executing on host: < :1027> 005 ( ) 02/16 10:38:51 Job terminated.

66

67 Annex 04 Modeling of species distribution based on fundamental niche concepts: the generation of geographic distribution models using openmodeller Fabiana Soares Santana 1,2, Marinez Ferreira de Siqueira 3, Antônio Mauro Saraiva 4 1 Doutoranda, Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Brasil. 2 Professora, Centro Universitário FEI; São Paulo, Brasil. 3 Pesquisadora associada ao CRIA Centro de Referência em Informação Ambiental.Campinas, SP, Brasil. 4 Professor Associado, Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Brasil. Abstract In order to answer some biodiversity questions, predictive modeling of species distributions represents an important tool in biogeography, evolution, ecology, conservation, and invasive-species management. Fundamental niche concepts combine occurrence data with ecological/environmental variables to create a model of the species requirements for the examined variables. The main objective is, with primary occurrence data or absence data in the form of georeferenced coordinates of latitude and longitude for confirmed localities, to generate a model that predicts the species potential geographic distribution, that can be projected onto a map of the study region. OpenModeller is a framework for species distribution modeling. It is an open source library being developed as part of the specieslink project. It is entirely based on open source software to accomplish tasks like reading different map file formats, converting between coordinate systems, and performing calculations, in order to providing researchers with the required tools to compare modeling methodologies easily, and to spend more time analyzing and interpreting results. Algorithm using frameworks that take care of handling input data and making projections. Moreover, in the near future, generic libraries like openmodeller will be able to perform tasks in a distributed fashion, including running analyses separately in remote cluster processors via web services or GRID paradigms. The modeling process is usually quite complex and time consuming. Preparation of environmental layers is one of the most time-consuming, and computer intensive areas of modeling. There are so many details in collecting and preparing data to be analyzed, selecting the algorithm that best predicts species distribution, and analyzing and interpreting the results, that a single forgot item can lead to big mistakes. So, independent of the modeling software and tools, modeling process must be detailed and really understood, in order to can be correctly applied. This paper intends to show the complete process, and its details, to modeling of species distribution based on fundamental niche concepts in a correct way. Thus, because process first (premodeling analysis) and last (post-modeling analysis) steps are not restricted to OpenModeller implementation, this paper is interesting for several environment researches.

68 1. Introduction Biodiversity informatics community has become available a lot of biotic and abiotic data, and the amount and diversity of datasets continues to increase and become more readily accessible over the internet (Guralnick & Neufeld 2005). These data are the essential starting point to study all environmental management processes like estimating biodiversity and modeling distribution patterns (Chapman et al. 2005). As these data have become available, it has become clear that an equally challenge is that of building tools for data synthesis and analysis (Guralnick & Neufeld 2005) to improve a standards-based global computing infrastructure to allow rapid, real-time discovery, access, visualization, interpretation, and analysis of biodiversity information (Bisby 2000; Canhos et al. 2004; Krishtalka & Humphrey 2000; Sugden & Pennisi 2000; Wilson 2000). (Guralnick & Neufeld 2005) are made a lot of questions, in order to move forward on such an endeavor. 1. What methodology and tools should be used to georeference the data? 2. How should data access and transmission be addressed, so that an online, global-scale GIS can access appropriate biodiversity data? 3. How can a system be built that is efficient and fast enough for users to sort through the large amounts of data potentially available? 4. How can a distributed GIS be built that can handle heterogeneous data sources? 5. How can such a system present attribute data effectively, both in text form and on maps, with potentially billions of data points and thousands of repositors? 6. How can analysis tools be built into a web mapping application so that users can perform as many tasks as possible online and easily export datasets out of the online applications for further use on their desktops? 7. How can the community overcome potential sociological barriers to build such a tool most effectively? In order to answer some of that questions, predictive modeling of species distributions represents an important tool in biogeography, evolution, ecology, conservation, and invasive-species management. Fundamental niche concepts combine occurrence data with ecological/environmental variables (both biotic and abiotic factors: e.g. temperature, precipitation, elevation, geology, and vegetation) to create a model of the species requirements for the examined variables. The main objective is, with primary occurrence data or absence data in the form of georeferenced coordinates of latitude and longitude for confirmed localities, to generate a model that predicts the species potential geographic distribution, that can be projected onto a map of the study region. (Anderson et al. 2003) Niche models, can be use in works about potential invasive species valuation (Peterson et al. 2003a; Peterson et al. 2003b), climatic changes impacts on biodiversity (Huntley et al. 1995; Magana et al. 1997; Oberhauser & Peterson 2003; Peterson et al. 2002a; Sala et al. 2000; Siqueira & Peterson 2003; Thomas et al. 2004), delineate potentials rute of infectious diseases (Petersen & Roehrig 2001; Peterson et al. 2002b), also to indicate potentials priority areas for conservation (Bojorquez-Tapia et al. 1995; Chen & Peterson 2002; Egbert et al. 1998; Ortega- Huerta & Peterson 2004) and like an auxiliary tool to find species in field work (Siqueira et al. in prep.) More than that, these techniques are particularly indicated in situations where decisions have to be made but the information (biotic data) is not enough to do that. This situation is quite common in tropics, where data field survey is poorly and sparse.

69 However, there is a series of limitations intrinsical in such method used. It is urgently and needy, it is necessary that put available methodology to evaluate, test and help researchers to compare and choice the best model results. OpenModeller is a framework for species distribution modeling. It is an open source library being developed as part of the specieslink project. It is entirely based on open source software to accomplish tasks like reading different map file formats, converting between coordinate systems, and performing calculations. First version was developed at CRIA 19 (Centro de Referência em Informação Ambiental), and now there are several research groups working together to increase its potential and technology, increasing the species distribution modeling itself, like researches at Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo. More information about the framework can be found at These initiatives are providing researchers with the required tools to compare modeling methodologies easily, and to spend more time analyzing and interpreting results. Algorithm using frameworks that take care of handling input data and making projections. Moreover, in the near future, generic libraries like openmodeller will be able to perform tasks in a distributed fashion, including running analyses separately in remote cluster processors via web services or GRID paradigms (Canhos et al. 2004). The modeling process is usually quite complex and time consuming. Preparation of environmental layers is one of the most timeconsuming, and computer intensive areas of modeling (Chapman et al. 2005). There are so many details in collecting and preparing data to be analyzed, selecting the algorithm that best predicts species distribution, and analyzing and interpreting the results, that a single forgot item can lead to big mistakes. So, independent of the modeling software and tools, modeling process must be detailed and really understood, in order to can be correctly applied. This paper intends to show the complete process, and its details, to modeling of species distribution based on fundamental niche concepts in a correct way. Thus, because process first (pre-modeling analysis) and last (post-modeling analysis) steps are not restricted to OpenModeller implementation, this paper is interesting for several environment researches. 19

70 2. Process 2.1. Pre-modeling analysis Niche models have universally been validated via comparisons with occurrences in geographic space, even though they are models of ecological niches and not geographic distributions (Soberón & Peterson 2005). Large numbers of occurrence points can be distinct in geographic space but could represent a few environmental combinations (Soberón & Peterson 2005). For the authors, this approach has seen little or no exploration and this gap appears to result form lack of effective tools for exploring, analyzing, and visualizing ecological niches in manydimensional environmental space. Once such tools are developed, testing ecological niche models in ecological space will constitute an important step forward in improving the formal nature of ecological niche modeling (Soberón & Peterson 2005). Process starts with a set of decisions that must be taken by the researcher. We can call this by pre-modeling analysis, and the complete process can be found at fig Pre-modeling analysis starts with the definition of a set of questions that modeling based on fundamental niche should answersome examples can be: What is the today s species distribution pattern? or What is the future species distribution pattern? The following step is to get species presence points. It is also important to get some informations about presence points, like data format, and classification of georeferenced coordinates (city, location, GPS), and verify quality and amount of presence points, because without presence points (and/or absence points?) anything can be. All modeling algoritms available at OpenModeller needs presence points to work. Next, is necessary to identify environment data that are needed to generate the model, and get them. Obtained environment data must be enough to generate the model, and it is defined by (não entendi!)ideally, environment data must have adequate resolution, and obtaining method and data. These files can be found in very format data types, like shown in fig The last step at Pre-modeling analysis consists of analyzing all obtained information, in order to decide if there is enough information to start the predictive modeling of species distributions based on fundamental niche concepts. If available data are not enough, it is better try to get more information before continuing the process, otherwise results may be incorrectfor more information about decision criteria, see (Chapman et al. 2005). It is also possible to work in a different way, when presence points are known, but the others steps are not defined yet. Then, the solution is to work in a circle process (see figure 2.1.2) until all steps were concluded. Activities, tools, and comments are the same written in figure In any situation, the final step must be analyze data, because it defines if the modeling has chances to get reasonable answers for the problem. Figure Pré-modeling circular analysis process

71 Figure Pré-modeling analysis process 2.2. Model generation After pre-modeling analysis is finished, next step consists of using modeling algorithms to get geographic species distribution models based on fundamental niche concepts. This entire process can be seen in fig At first, is necessary to verify if all available data are in the correct format, and if they all should be used. OpenModeller works with the following input formats:.txt files,.xml files etc., so it is necessary to convert input data to one of the specified data types, otherwise they will not be useful. It is also necessary to see if all data are in the same system coordinates, including environment layers and presence or absence points. Also, researcher must decide if all points are relevant to model generation. For instance, if a point is not reliable, sometimes the best solution is to put it away and proceed using others available data.

72 Figure Model generation Since input data are ready, is important to define which algorithm will be used to generate species distribution models. OpenModeller. The current package includes several algorithms like: Distance to Average (Munõz 2004a); Minimum Distance (Munõz 2004c); Bioclim (Nix 1986); Bioclim distance (Munõz 2004b); Climate Space Model - Kaiser- Gutman (Sutton & Giovanni 2004b); Climate Space Model - Broken-Stick (Sutton & Giovanni 2004a); GARP - Genetic Algorithm for Rule-set Production (Stockwell & Noble 1992; Stockwell & Peters 1999); GARP - Genetic Algorithm for Rule-set Production with Best Subsets Procedure (Anderson et al. 2003), also includes SOAP, command line interface and a desktop interface is available as a plugin for the QuantumGIS project (Canhos et al. 2004). All algorithms, in essence, extrapolate from associations between point occurrences and environmental data sets to identify areas of predict presence on the map (Soberón & Peterson 2005). These areas are similar ecologically to those where the species is known to occur, and this procedure can be termed as the correlative approach to ecological niche modeling (Soberón & Peterson 2005). Once an algorithm is defined, is necessary to define parameters to execute it in a precise way. Usually, parameters are numeric values passed to algorithm as input, in order to control some aspects of its behavior. Each algorithm has its own parameters, and it is not possible to generalize their applications. In another session, we will discuss algorithms application and choice, detailing each parameter of all implementations available at OpenModeller. Once every detail is treated, it is just necessary to execute the chosen algorithm, and wait for a solution. OpenModeller will show the generated geographic species distribution

73 model based on fundamental niche concepts, as a graphic map Final analysis After a geographic species distribution model based on fundamental niche concepts is generated, the next step is to evaluate it, and see if it is correct. This step is called postmodeling analysis, and consists of only two activities (see Figure Post-modeling analysis process). Figure Post-modeling analysis process Model analysis is, basically, a compare among available presence or absence points, and the distribution model based on fundamental niche concepts that is generated. Of course, if the researcher has another reliable points, that are not used in the model generation, this step is not very difficult. On the other hand, if the researcher does not, it may be necessary to go to the geographic place in order to verify if results are correct. Sometimes, it is not possible, and in this case may be necessary to search on the literature, or on the Internet, or in data basis, when they are available. This may happen, for instance, in past or future analysis, and when the place to visit is not accessible to the researcher by geographic conditions, or insufficient resources. This approach will bring results that are as reliable as the available data reliability. The last step of the all modeling process is called End stage, and basically consists of to decide, based on previous analysis, if the model is good enough for the researcher needs, or not. If the model is good, the job is finished. Otherwise, it may be necessary to return to a previous step. In this case, is important to verify if the available data are enough to a correct model generation, or if is necessary to obtain another data to enforce the modeling based on fundamental niche results, before return to a previous step, and re-start modeling process.

74 Conclusions Innovation and infrastructure developments will greatly reduce long-term data capture costs in the broader biodiversity community. Modular, configurable, open-source Web services will provide interoperability and scalability in distributed environments. By wrapping image processing, image-to-text conversion, and data markup capabilities into distributed, interoperable web services, greater efficiency, portability, and scalability will be achieved (Canhos et al. 2004).

75 Bibliografia Anderson, R. P., D. Lew and A. T. Peterson Evaluating predictive models of species' distributions: criteria for selecting optimal models Bisby, F. A The Quiet Revolution: Biodiversity Informatics and the Internet : Bojorquez-Tapia, L. A., I. Azuara, E. Ezcurra and O. A. Flores V Identifying conservation priorities in Mexico through geographic information systems and modeling Canhos, V. P., S. Souza, R. Giovanni and D. A. L. Canhos Global biodiversity informatics: setting the scene for a "New World" of Ecological Modeling Chapman, A. D., M. E. S. Munõz and I. Kock Environmental Information: Placing Biodiversity Phenomena in an Ecological and Environmental Context Chen, G. and A. T. Peterson Prioritization of areas in China for biodiversity conservation based on the distribution of endangered bird species Egbert, S. L., A. T. Peterson, V. Sanchez-Cordero and K. P. Price Modeling conservation priorities in Veracruz, Mexico. GIS in natural resource management: Balancing the technical-political equation. High Mountain Press. Santa Fe, New Mexico. Guralnick, R. and D. Neufeld Challenges building online GIS services to support global biodivesity mapping and analysis: lessons from the mountain and plains database and informatics project Huntley, B., P. M. Berry, W. Cramer and A. P. McDonald Modelling present and potential future ranges of some European higher plants using climate response surfaces Krishtalka, L. and S. Humphrey Can natural history museums capture the future? 50 7: Magana, V., C. Conde, O. Sanchez and C. Gay Assessment of current and future regional climate scenarios for Mexico Munõz, M. E. S. 2004a. Algorithm Distance to Average. 2006/01/11. Itemid=39 Munõz, M. E. S. 2004b. Bioclim distance. 2006/01/11. Itemid=39

76 Munõz, M. E. S. 2004c. Minimum Distance. 2006/01/11. Itemid=39 Nix, H. A A biogeographic analysis of Australian elapid snakes. Atlas of Australian Elapid Snakes. Australian Government Publishing Service. Canberra. Oberhauser, K. and A. T. Peterson Modelling current and future potencial wintering distributions of eastern North American monarch butterflies : Ortega-Huerta, M. A. and A. T. Peterson Modelling spatial patterns of biodiversity for conservation prioritization in North-eastern Mexico Petersen, L. R. and J. T. Roehrig West Nile virus: A reemerging global pathogen Peterson, A. T., M. A. Ortega-Huerta, J. Bartley, V. Sanchez-Cordero, J. Soberón, R. H. Buddemeier and D. R. B. Stockwell. 2002a. Future projections for Mexican faunas under global climate change scenarios Peterson, A. T., M. Papes and D. A. Kluza. 2003a. Predicting the potential invasive distributions of four alien plant species in North America. 51 6: Peterson, A. T., V. Sanchez-Cordero, C. B. Beard and J. M. Ramsey. 2002b. Ecologic niche modeling and potential reservoirs for Chagas disease, Mexico Peterson, A. T., R. Scachetti-Pereira and D. A. Kluza. 2003b. Assessment of Invasive Invasive Potential of Homalodisca coagulata in Western North America and South America. 3 1: Sala, O. E., F. S. Chapin-III, J. J. Armesto, E. Berlow, J. Bloomfield, R. Dirzo, E. Huber- Sanwald, L. F. Huenneke, R. B. Jackson, A. Kinzig, R. Leemans, D. M. Lodge, H. A. Mooney, M. Oesterheld, N. L. Poff, M. T. Sykes, B. H. Walker, M. Walker and D. H. Wall Global biodiversity scenarios for the year : Siqueira, M. F., G. Durigan and P. D. Marco Jr. in prep. Something from Nothing: Using Landscape Similarity and Ecological Niche Modeling to Find Rare Plant Species. Siqueira, M. F. d. and A. T. Peterson Consequences of Global Climate Change for Geographic Distributions of Cerrado Tree Species. 3 2: Soberón, J. and A. T. Peterson Interpretation of models of fundamental ecological niches and species' distributional areas

77 Stockwell, D. R. B. and I. R. Noble Induction of sets of rules from animal distribution data: A robust and informative method of analysis Stockwell, D. R. B. and D. P. Peters The GARP modelling system: Problems and solutions to automated spatial prediction Sugden, A. and E. Pennisi Diversity digitized Sutton, T. and R. Giovanni. 2004a. Climate Space Model - Broken-Stick. 2006/01/11. Itemid=39 Sutton, T. and R. Giovanni. 2004b. Climate Space Model - Kaiser-Gutman. 2006/01/11. emid=39 Thomas, C. D., A. Cameron, R. E. Green, M. Bakkenes, L. J. Beaumont, Y. C. Collingham, B. F. N. Erasmus, M. F. d. Siqueira, A. Grainger, L. Hannah, L. Hughes, B. Huntley, A. S. v. Jaarsveld, G. F. Midgley, L. Miles, M. A. Ortega- Huerta, A. T. Peterson, O. L. Phillips and S. E. Williams Extinction risk from climate change Wilson, E. O A global biodiversity map

78 Annex 05 Figure 2.1 Pre-modeling analyzes Figure 2.2 Model generation and final analyzes

79 Figure openmodeller backbone

80 Annex 06 Tutorial de compilação e execução do openmodeller Introdução Esse tutorial tem a finalidade de descrever os passos para a compilação do código fonte em MS Visual C++ 7 do módulo om do projeto openmodeller adquirido no CVS (mais informações Apêndice A) e execução de uma simulação simples. Ele é baseado na estrutura de diretórios definidos no CD e no código fonte da versão Configuração do ambiente Esta parte do tutorial tem por finalidade montar o ambiente de compilação e execução do módulo om. (1) A partir do CD de instalação, copie o conteúdo da pasta \windows para um diretório do disco rígido, para referência futura, chamaremos ele de <om-dir> (2) Configure as seguintes variáveis de ambiente no sistema e insira-ás na variável PATH : Nome da variável Valor da variável Valor na variável PATH GDAL_HOME <om-dir>\thid-party\fwtools1.0.0a7 %GDAL_HOME%\bin EXPAT_HOME <om-dir>\thid-party\expat % EXPAT_HOME % \Libs GSL_HOME <om-dir>\thid-party\gnuwin32 % GSL_HOME %\bin GDAL_DATA %GDAL_HOME%\data % GDAL_DATA% Compilação do código-fonte Segue abaixo os passos necessaries para a compilação do módulo om : (1) Abra o Microsoft Visual Studio 7 (2) Vá ao item File->Open Solution e abra o projeto no diretório: <om-dir>\src\om\windows\vc7\om_vcpp7.sln (3) Vá ao item Build->Configuration Manager e altere o item Active Solution Configuration para Release

81 (4) Vá ao item Build e selectione Build Solution. (5) A compilação será bem sucedida se todos os 12 módulos forem compilados corretamente, como mostrado na figura abaixo. 3. Execução Para executar o código compilado: (1) Abra um prompt de comando no windows (2) Vá ao diretório <om-dir>\console (3) Execute o comando om.bat request.txt. (4) O resultado da simulação será apresentado no diretório <om-dir>\console\output O usuário poderá configurar no arquivo <om-dir>\console\request.txt todos os parâmetros de execução do framework. A opção padrão para execução está configurada para utilizar a espécie furcarta boliviana, ficando a cargo do usuário inserir dados de novas espécies e ambientais, além de gerenciar a localização dos mesmos.

82 Apêndice A Caso o usuário queria trocar o código-fonte a ser compilado, ele deve sobrescrever o conteúdo da pasta <om-dir>\src e realizar as alterações nos seguintes arquivos: (1) Algorithm.cpp : Comente o try-catch que começa na linha 138. (2) GeoTransform.cpp : Comente o item CPLSetErrorHandler( errorhandler ) na linha 178.

83 Annex 07 Download do openmodeller com WinCVS 1. Introdução Esse documento tem o objetivo de explicar os passos para a obtenção do código fonte do openmodeller localizado no servidor do Source Forge. O texto não abrange a instalação ou utilização do CVS ou do WinCVS, para isso utilize os link localizados no item Usuário anônimo a. Abra a interface gráfica do WinCVS b. Vá ao item do menu Remote e selecione Checkout module c. Preencha o item Module name and path on the Server com nome do modulo desejado do projeto openmodeller. d. Selecione Local folder to check out to, o nome da pasta no disco rígido onde será feito o download. e. No item CVSROOT clique no botão f. Na janela que surgir utilize as seguintes propriedades: - Protocol : pserver - Repository path : /cvsroot/openmodeller - Username : anonymous - Hostname : cvs.sourceforge.net 2. Usuário Sourge Forge a. Abra a interface gráfica do WinCVS b. Vá ao item do menu Remote e selecione Checkout module c. Preencha o item Module name and path on the Server com nome do modulo desejado do projeto openmodeller. d. Selecione Local folder to check out to, o nome da pasta no disco rígido onde será feito o download. e. No item CVSROOT clique no botão

84 f. Na janela que surgir utilize as seguintes propriedades: - Protocol: ssh - Repository path: /cvsroot/openmodeller - Username: <source-forge username> - Password: <source-forge username> - Hostname: cvs.sourceforge.net 3. Módulos disponíveis Segue abaixo a lista de módulos disponíveis no CVS : 4. Links a. om : Núcleo do openmodeller b. omgui0 : Interface gráfica feita em QT3, versão estável c. omgui1 : Interface gráfica feita em Qt4, ainda em desenvolvimento d. omgui2 : Interface gráfica em Qt4, ainda em fase de concepção Segue uma lista de links com informações sobre CVS e sua utilização.

85 Annex 08 openmodeller Class Documentation OccurrencesReader Class Reference Detailed Description A common interface to occurrence readers. Implementations need to define the loadoccurrences method and a constructor with parameters "const char *source" and "const char *coord_system" Public Member Functions virtual ~OccurrencesReader () virtual int loadoccurrences (const char *source)=0 int numoccurrences () OccurrencesPtr get (const char *groupid) void printoccurrences (char *msg="") Member Typedef Documentation typedef std::vector<occurrencesptr> OccurrencesReader::LstOccurrences [protected] Definition at line 89 of file OccurrencesReader.hh. Constructor & Destructor Documentation virtual OccurrencesReader::~OccurrencesReader () [inline, virtual] Definition at line 47 of file OccurrencesReader.hh.OccurrencesReader::OccurrencesReader () [inline, protected] Definition at line 98 of file OccurrencesReader.hh. Member Function Documentation OccurrencesPtr OccurrencesReader::get (const char * groupid) Return the occurrences from a specific group. Parameters: groupid Identifier for a group of occurrences (usually a species name).

86 Returns: Pointer to occurrences of the specified group, or to the last added group of available occurrences (if no group was specified), or 0 if the group was not found. int OccurrencesReader::insertOcurrence (const char * groupid, Coord lg, Coord lt, Scalar error, Scalar abundance, int num_attributes, Scalar * attributes) [protected] Insert a new occurrence. Each occurrence belongs to a group (usually a species name). Parameters: groupid Group identifier (usually a species name). lg Longitude. lt Latitude. error Associated error. abundance Number of "individuals". num_attributes Number of extra attributes. attributes Extra attributes. Returns: 0 if occurrence was added to an existing group, 1 if group was created. virtual int OccurrencesReader::loadOccurrences (const char * source) [pure virtual] Load occurrences from a specific source. Parameters: source Source of occurrences (like an url or a file name). int OccurrencesReader::numOccurrences () [inline] Return the number of available occurrences. Returns: total number of occurrences. Definition at line 57 of file OccurrencesReader.hh.void OccurrencesReader::printOccurrences (char * msg = "") Print the occurrences to cout. Parameters: msg Optional string to be printed before the occurrences.

87 Annex 09 openmodeller Class Documentation Raster Class Reference Detailed Description Declarations of Raster and RasterFormat classes. Public Member Functions virtual ~Raster () virtual void createraster (const std::string &source, int categ=0)=0 virtual void createraster (const std::string &source, const MapFormat &format)=0 Header & header () int iscategorical () const Coord xmin () const Coord ymin () const Coord xmax () const Coord ymax () const int dimx () const int dimy () const Coord celx () const Coord cely () const Scalar noval () const int numband () const virtual int get (Coord px, Coord py, Scalar *val)=0 virtual int put (Coord px, Coord py, Scalar val)=0 virtual int put (Coord px, Coord py)=0 bool hasminmax () void setminmax (Scalar min, Scalar max) int getminmax (Scalar *min, Scalar *max) Constructor & Destructor Documentation virtual Raster::~Raster () [virtual] Raster::Raster () [inline, protected] Definition at line 150 of file Raster.hh. Member Function Documentation Coord Raster::celX () const [inline] Returns the longitudinal cell dimension.

88 Definition at line 89 of file Raster.hh.Coord Raster::celY () const [inline] Returns the latitudinal cell dimension. Definition at line 92 of file Raster.hh.virtual void Raster::createRaster (const std::string & source, const MapFormat & format) [pure virtual] Method to create a raster representation (needed by RasterFactory). Parameters: source A string pointing to a raster source (file name, URL, etc.) format Map format virtual void Raster::createRaster (const std::string & source, int categ = 0) [pure virtual] Method to create a raster representation (needed by RasterFactory). Parameters: source A string pointing to a raster source (file name, URL, etc.) categ Indicates if the raster is categorical or not int Raster::dimX () const [inline] Returns the longitudinal map dimension. Definition at line 83 of file Raster.hh.int Raster::dimY () const [inline] Returns the latitudinal map dimension. Definition at line 86 of file Raster.hh.virtual int Raster::get (Coord px, Coord py, Scalar * val) [pure virtual] Fills '*val' with the map value at (x,y). Parameters: px Longitude py Latitude val Value Returns: zero if (x,y) is out of range. int Raster::getMinMax (Scalar * min, Scalar * max) Finds the minimum and maximum values in the first band. Parameters: min Pointer to minimum value max Pointer to maximum value Returns: 1 if values are present, 0 otherwise bool Raster::hasMinMax () [inline] Tells if the min and max have already been computed Definition at line 126 of file Raster.hh.Header& Raster::header () [inline] Returns the header. Definition at line 65 of file Raster.hh.int Raster::isCategorical () const [inline] Returns not zero if this map is categorical.

89 Definition at line 68 of file Raster.hh.Scalar Raster::noVal () const [inline] Returns the "noval" value. Definition at line 95 of file Raster.hh.int Raster::numBand () const [inline] Returns the number of bands. Definition at line 98 of file Raster.hh.virtual int Raster::put (Coord px, Coord py) [pure virtual] Put 'no data val' at the (x,y) coordinate. Supports only single band files. Parameters: px Longitude py Latitude Returns: 0 if (x,y) is out of range or the map is read only. virtual int Raster::put (Coord px, Coord py, Scalar val) [pure virtual] Put 'val' at the (x,y) coordinate. Supports only single band output files. Parameters: px Longitude py Latitude val Value Returns: 0 if (x,y) is out of range or the map is read only. void Raster::setMinMax (Scalar min, Scalar max) Support external specification of min/max. Parameters: min Minimum value max Maximum value Coord Raster::xMax () const [inline] Returns the highest longitude. Definition at line 77 of file Raster.hh.Coord Raster::xMin () const [inline] Returns the lowest longitude. Definition at line 71 of file Raster.hh.Coord Raster::yMax () const [inline] Returns the highest latitude. Definition at line 80 of file Raster.hh.Coord Raster::yMin () const [inline] Returns the lowest latitude.

90 Annex 10 Documento de Projeto Básico para a Arquitetura da Interface openmodeller-terralib Responsável: Alexandre Copertino Jardim Supervisão: Lúbia Vinhas

91 Índice 1. Introdução TerraLib Integração openmodeller-terralib Acesso aos dados de entrada e saída do openmodeller Reformulação da arquitetura das classes de acesso aos dados Extensão das classes de acesso via TerraLib Acessando o banco TerraLib TerraLib Conclusões Referências.101

92 Documento de Projeto Básico para a Arquitetura da Interface openmodeller-terralib 1. Introdução O openmodeller é uma ferramenta open source para modelagem estática de distribuição espacial desenvolvido pela equipe do CRIA como parte do projeto specieslink (financiado pela Fapesp). Atualmente é utilizado para prever a distribuição de espécies (nicho fundamental), utilizando diferentes algoritmos. Os modelos são gerados por um algoritmo que recebe como parâmetros um conjunto de pontos de ocorrência (latitude/longitude) e um conjunto de mapas de variáveis ambientais. O openmodeller é construído na linguagem C++ (Stroustrup, 1997) ANSI tendo em vista a manutenção da independência quanto a plataforma de utilização. Para acessar os dados de ocorrência, mapas de variáveis ambientais, e gerar resultados o openmodeller utiliza a biblioteca GDAL 20. A GDAL permite a decodificação de vários formatos para arquivos de dados matriciais, que podem conter os mapas de variáveis ambientais (ex. TIFF, ASCII-GRID, etc), e também guardar os resultados da execução dos modelos. A Figura 1 mostra a arquitetura geral do openmodeller, que pode ser acessado através de uma interface console ou uma interface gráfica. Ambas as interfaces geram um arquivo de requisições o qual é processado em seu modo de acesso via interface por linha de comando e via interface gráfica. 20 Maiores informações sobre a GDAL podem ser obtidas no site

93 Interface Console Interface Gráfica Arquivo de Requisições openmodeller GDAL Arquivos Arquivos Figura 1 Arquitetura do openmodeller. 2. TerraLib A TerraLib 21 é uma biblioteca de classes escritas em C++ para a construção de aplicativos geográficos, com código fonte aberto e distribuída como software livre. Destina-se a servir como base para o desenvolvimento cooperativo na comunidade de usuários ou desenvolvedores de SIG s Sistemas de Informação Geográfica. A TerraLib fornece funções para a decodificação de dados geográficos, estruturas de dados espaço-temporais, algoritmos de análise espacial além de propor um modelo para um banco de dados geográficos. Uma das características mais importantes da TerraLib é a sua capacidade de interação com sistemas de gerenciamento de bancos de dados objeto-relacionais (SGBD-OR) para armazenar dados geográficos, tanto em sua componente descritiva quanto sua componente espacial. A principal vantagem desse modelo de arquitetura integrada é que, além de usufruir para todo o dado espacial das funcionalidades tradicionais de SGBDs como controle de acesso e concorrência, permite o compartilhamento de grandes bases de dados, em ambientes coorporativos, por aplicações customizadas para diferentes tipos de usuários. 21 Maiores informações sobre a TerraLib podem ser encontradas (Vinhas; Ferreira, 2005) e no site

94 3. Integração openmodeller-terralib Para a construção de um ambiente computacional aberto e integrado para a modelagem de distribuição de espécies, é essencial que se tenha a disposição pelo menos dois ambientes computacionais com instrumentos para: a construção e testes de modelos de distribuição de espécies e; capacidade para armazenar, recuperar e atualizar os dados e resultados de modelos em sistemas gerenciadores de banco de dados com extensão para o tratamento de informações no espaço e no tempo. Os ambientes openmodeller e TerraLib se complementam e respondem exatamente a estas necessidades. Integrar estes dois ambientes é tarefa essencial para os passos futuros no projeto em andamento A integração entre sistemas é uma técnica eficiente de projeto de software que consiste na combinação de componentes de software para gerar sistemas mais complexos. Dessa forma economizando tempo e recursos e permitindo o uso de ferramentas especializadas em cada área de um projeto mais amplo. Os dados de ocorrência e mapas de variáveis ambientais que o openmodeller utiliza são dados geográficos, que podem estar armazenados em um banco de dados TerraLib conforme descrito acima. Essa interface pretende acrescentar funcionalidades ao openmodeller de forma que os dados armazenados em um banco TerraLib possam ser acessados pelos modelos escritos em openmodeller. O principal requisito a ser considerado para a construção dessa interface é a de que os usuários de openmodeller possam escrever seus modelos de maneira bastante similar ao que já fazem quando utilizam dados de entrada e resultados em arquivos. Um dos requisitos do projeto é a mínima intervenção nas classes básicas do openmodeller e portanto, essa proposta de integração concentra-se principalmente nas classes e estruturas responsáveis pelo acesso aos dados. 3.1 Acesso aos dados de entrada e saída do openmodeller A atual arquitetura do openmodeller baseia-se na entidade mapa (representado na classe Map) que contém os dados ambientais que alimentam os modelos e também são o resultado da execução de um modelo. Um mapa contém uma grade de valores de certa variável ambiental. Mapas são construídos a partir de representações matriciais de dados ambientais capturados na classe Raster, que é responsável por decodificar os metadados sobre os mapas de variáveis ambientais, tratados na classe Header, acessar e disponibilizar os valores das variáveis ambientais em cada ponto da grade. Essa classe passa a responsabilidade de decodificação dos diferentes formatos dos mapas para a biblioteca GDAL. A Figura 2 mostra o diagrama das classes envolvidas, na arquitetura atual, para acessar os mapas de variáveis ambientais.

95 Figura 2 Arquitetura principal das classes do openmodeller. A arquitetura do openmodeller obtém os dados de ocorrências de espécies a partir de um arquivo texto (.txt), representado na classe OccurrencesFile. Esta classe é responsável por preencher uma estrutura de dados chamada OccurrencesPtr que representa uma lista de ocorrências de espécies. A Figura 3 mostra como a interface console do openmodeller, que manipula arquivos de requisição utiliza o arquivo de ocorrências. Figura 3 Acesso as ocorrências pela interface console do openmodeller. 3.2 Reformulação da arquitetura das classes de acesso aos dados Para permitir a utilização de mapas de variáveis ambientais armazenados em um banco de dados TerraLib, é proposta uma mudança nas classes que fazem acesso aos dados de entrada e saída de resultados do openmodeller. A classe Raster deve ser transformada em uma interface, ou seja, uma classe totalmente abstrata da qual a classe RasterGdal é uma implementação concreta. Dessa forma o openmodeller passa a trabalhar com a interface Raster, e qualquer classe que implemente a classe Raster passa a ser entendida pelo openmodeller. A Figura 4 mostra essa nova arquitetura.

96 Figura 4 A interface Raster. A fim de flexibilizar o acesso aos dados de ocorrências, de forma que também possam ser obtidos de bancos TerraLib, foi criada a interface abstrata OccurrencesReader. E a classe OccurrencesFile passa a ser uma implementação dessa interface. Sugere-se que a interface OccurrencesReader juntamente com a implementação OccurencesFile faça parte do módulo env_io como mostra a Figura 5. Figura 5 A interface OccurencesReader. Para permitir a flexibilização da instanciação das classes concretas de acesso aos dados manipulados pelo openmodeller, propõe-se o uso do padrão de projeto Factory (Gamma et al., 1995), instâncias de objetos não são explicitamente criadas, mas sim pedidas a uma fábrica que decide qual o objeto deve ser criado, com base por exemplo em parâmetros. As Figuras 6 e 7 mostram as fábricas de representações matriciais e de leitores de ocorrências respectivamente.

97 Figura 6 Fábrica de leitores de ocorrências. Figura 7 Fábrica de representações matriciais. Para manter a independência das aplicações openmodeller em relação à extensão da TerraLib ambas as fábricas devem ser implementadas como Singletons (Gamma et al., 1995) ou seja, possuírem uma única instância válida em todas as aplicações finais e produzirem por default, os objetos já existentes no openmodeller: OccurencesFile e RasterGal. 3.3 Extensão das classes de acesso via TerraLib Para acomodar as classes e estruturas que fazem parte da integração é proposta a criação de uma extensão da TerraLib chamada de om_terralib onde serão colocadas todas as implementações concretas, usando a TerraLib para as classes de acesso aos dados manipulados pelo openmodeller. A TerraLib possui sua própria interface para a acessar dados com representação matricial, armazenados em bancos de dados, e também em arquivos, chamada de TeRaster

98 (Vinhas; de Souza, 2005). Para adequar as duas interfaces: TeRaster da TerraLib e Raster do openmodeller, propõe-se a construção de um adaptador chamado de TeOMRaster que implementa a interface Raster usando a classe TeRaster da TerraLib. A Figura 8 mostra essa proposta de arquitetura. Figura 8 Extensão TerraLib para acesso a mapas. Ainda que a arquitetura proposta tenha por objetivo principal o acesso aos mapas armazenados em um banco de dados, ela também fornece uma alternativa de utilização do openmodeller, com a TerraLib como a biblioteca de decodificação de mapas em arquivos. No módulo om_terralib foi criada a classe TeOccurrences que também é uma implementação da interface OccurrencesReader e preenche uma lista de ocorrências com os dados armazenados em um banco TerraLib. A Figura 9 mostra a proposta de arquitetura da implementação TerraLib para a classe de decodificação de dados de ocorrências, exemplificada pelo uso feito pela interface console do openmodeller, que processa um arquivo de requisição representado na classe RequestFile. Essa classe agora trabalha com a interface OccurrencesReader que pode ser tanto um OccurrencesFile, que lê as ocorrências num arquivo texto (.txt), ou um TeOccurrences que lê as ocorrências de um banco TerraLib.

99 Figura 9 Extensão TerraLib para acesso a dados de ocorrências. Resumindo as modificações propostas acima, a nova arquitetura possibilita o uso do ambiente openmodeller com a capacidade de trabalhar com variáveis ambientais e gerar resultados através da biblioteca GDAL e da biblioteca TerraLib; e os dados de ocorrências recuperados de arquivos textos, ou decodificados pela biblioteca TerraLiba partir dos dados armazenados em um banco de dados geográfico. 3.4 Acessando o banco TerraLib TerraLib Cada arquivo de dados, na arquitetura existente, representa ou um mapa de uma variável ambiental ou uma lista de pontos de ocorrências de espécies. Para acessar os dados em um banco de dados é necessário propor um mapeamento entre um arquivo de dados e o modelo conceito de armazenamento de um banco de dados TerraLib. Um banco de dados TerraLib organiza as informações em um conjunto de planos de informação, ou layers. Mapas de variáveis ambientais são mapeados para planos de informação com uma representação matricial (ver a Figura 10). Dados de ocorrência são mapeados para planos de informação que contém objetos com representação pontual (a localização da ocorrência) e que podem conter um conjunto de atributos, dentro os quais a espécie a qual a localização é relativa (ver a Figura 11).

100 Figura 10 Variável ambiental em um banco TerraLib. Figura 11 Dados de ocorrência em um banco de dados TerraLib. Um banco de dados TerraLib é um repositório de informações geográficas armazenados em um SGBD, por isso, e visando obter o menor impacto com a implementação existente, propõe-se estender o conceito de nome de arquivo para incluir as outras informações necessárias para se chegar ao dado armazenado no banco. Assim, propõe-se que mapas de variáveis ambientais e dados de ocorrência possam ser acessados a partir de uma descrição complexa, similar a uma URL - Universal Resource Locator e será chamado simplesmente de URL.

101 As URL s são usadas tanto pela fábrica de representações quanto pela fábrica de fontes de ocorrências para retornar as respectivas instâncias das classes concretas que decodificam esses objetos. O formato da URL deve ser capaz de representar todas as informações necessárias para se chegar ao dado, como por exemplo, os parâmetros de acesso ao banco de dados, ou a localização do plano de informação correspondente dentro dele. 4. Conclusões Esse documento apresentou a projeto básico da arquitetura de integração entre a TerraLib e o opnemodeller, apresentando ao longo do texto as razões técnicas apontadas para a solução apresentada. Ainda que essa proposta preveja algumas alterações na arquitetura atual do openmodeller essas alterações ficam restritas as classes de acesso dados e representam um impacto mínimo para os usuários do openmodeller. As extensões da TerraLib ficam restritas a um módulo da TerraLib e portanto deixa transparente para o programador openmodeller o ambiente TerraLib acoplado. 5. Referências Gamma, E.; Helm, R.; Johnson, R.; Vlissides, J. Design patterns: elements of reusable object-oriented software. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, Stroustrup, B. The C++ programming language, 3rd edition. Reading, MA: Addison- Wesley Publishing Company, p. Vinhas, L.; de Souza, R. C. M. Tratamento de Dados Matriciais na TerraLib. In: Casanova, M. A.; Câmara, G.; Davis Jr., C.; Vinhas, L.; Queiroz, G. R. (Ed.). Bancos de Dados Geográficos. Curitiba, PR: Editora Mundo-Geo, cap. 13, p Vinhas, L.; Ferreira, K. R. Descrição da TerraLib. In: Casanova, M. A.; Câmara, G.; Davis Jr., C. A.; Vinhas, L.; Queiroz, G. R. (Ed.). Bancos de dados geográficos. Curitiba, PR: MundoGeo, cap. 12, p

102 Annex 11 Release ( ) * Fixed bug in model projector that could cause localized distortions in the distribution map (near the grid cell scale). * New version of the CSM algorithm with several adjustments in code (Broken Stick cutoff method). * New command line tools om_sampledump, om_create, om_project. Release ( ) * Implemented serialization mechanism for the Best Subsets Procedure. * Moved the createmodel logic and ModelCommand object into Algorithm. * Fixed issues related to the Mac OS X build (for both 10.3 and 10.4). Release ( ) * Fixed bug that was making GARP produce null models (100% omission) most part of the time. Release ( ) * Major restructuring of directories, file locations and file names. Release 0.3 (planned to , but never happened) * Reimplemented serialization/deserialization mechanism using generic configuration objects. * All available algorithms are serializable. * om_console accepts new keywords "Output model" (file name to store the serialized model) and "Input model" to load a serialized model (instead of using "WKT format", "Species file", "Species" and "Map" to generate a model). * New framework for test cases is available (depends on the SWIG/Python interface). * Moved normalization from the individual raster files to the "environment" object.

103 * Implemented Model and Algorithm separation (new interface called Model abstracts the portion of Algorithm used for evaluations). * Implemented reference-counting smart pointers for all major objects. * Fixed various problems with memory leaks and uninitialized values. * Removed CSM Kaiser-Gutman from build. * Removed SWIG/Java binding from build. * Projected maps now have the mask extent and cell size of a specified "map format". Release ( ) * Added DesktopGarp version of GARP (as GARP 2.1). * Removed GARP 3.x from build due to instability under high dimensional datasets. * Best Subset Procedure was substituted by a new generic version that can be extended to encapsulate any GARP version. * Fixed bug in Bioclim distance algorithm (probabilities were greater than zero outside the envelop depending on the cutoff parameter). * Fixed bug in sampler class: when absence data was available, it was splitting train samplers once again and test samplers were coming out empty. Release 0.2 ( ) * Compatibility with Windows. * Compatibility with Mac OS. * Fixed issues with GDAL Release 0.2-rc1 ( ) * GARP algorithm, including best subsets procedure. * CSM splitted into Kaiser-Gutman and Broken Stick cutoff methods. * Prototype SOAP interface. * SWIG interfaces for python and java. * Bioclim algorithm refactored and splitted in two implementations. * Prototype model serialization for most algorithms. * Reprojection capabilities.

104 * New tool to visualize models in environmental space (only the first 2 variables). Release ( ) * Bugfix release: corrected problem of reading only the first algorithm's parameter. Release 0.1 ( ) Features: * A simple command-line (console) interface. * A driver to the GDAL library to read and write multiple map file formats. * Capability to deal with multiple coordinate systems using the proj4 library. * Two simple distance-based algorithms. * Bioclim algorithm. * Climate Space Model algorithm using Kaiser-Gutman cutoff.

105 Annex 12 openmodeller Class Documentation (openmodeller public interface for parameter settings, model creation and map projection) Detailed Description Defines and implements all commands to interface with the model generator. Public Member Functions OpenModeller () ~OpenModeller () void setloglevel (Log::Level level) char * getversion () AlgMetadata const ** availablealgorithms () AlgMetadata const * algorithmmetadata (char const *algorithm_id) int numavailablealgorithms () EnvironmentPtr getenvironment () AlgorithmPtr getalgorithm () Model getmodel () const SamplerPtr & getsampler () const int setoccurrences (const OccurrencesPtr &presence, const OccurrencesPtr &absence=occurrencesptr()) int setalgorithm (char const *id, int nparam, AlgParameter const *param) void setenvironment (std::vector< std::string > categ_map, std::vector< std::string > continuous_map, const std::string &mask) void setsampler (const SamplerPtr &sampler) void setmapcallback (MapCallback func, void *param=0) void setmapcommand (Projector::MapCommand *func) void createmap (const EnvironmentPtr &env, char const *output_file, MapFormat &format) void createmap (const EnvironmentPtr &env, char const *output_file) void createmap (char const *output_file, MapFormat &format) void createmap (char const *output_file) void setmodelcallback (ModelCallback func, void *param=0) void setmodelcommand (Algorithm::ModelCommand *func) int createmodel () int run () Scalar getvalue (const ConstEnvironmentPtr &env, Coord x, Coord y) Scalar getvalue (Scalar const *environment_values) char * error () AreaStats * getactualareastats () AreaStats * getestimatedareastats (double proportionareatosample=0.01) AreaStats * getestimatedareastats (const ConstEnvironmentPtr &env, double proportionareatosample=0.01)

106 ConfusionMatrix * getconfusionmatrix () ConfigurationPtr getconfiguration () const void setconfiguration (const ConstConfigurationPtr &) Constructor & Destructor Documentation OpenModeller::OpenModeller () OpenModeller::~OpenModeller () Member Function Documentation AlgMetadata const* OpenModeller::algorithmMetadata (char const * algorithm_id) Returns a specific algorithm metadata Parameters: algorithm_id Identifier of the algorithm. Returns: Algorithm's metadata or zero if the algorithm was not found. AlgMetadata const** OpenModeller::availableAlgorithms () Finds the system available algorithms' metadata. The pointer returned are copied from an internal storage of algorithms. So they can not be deallocated. Another point is that the AlgMetadata will be reallocated the next time this method is called. Returns: a null terminated list of available algorithms. void OpenModeller::createMap (char const * output_file) Create and save distribution map to disk. Projection environment defaults to the same environment used during model creation and previously set by calling the setenvironment() method. Output format defaults to the output mask format. Parameters: output_file Output file name. void OpenModeller::createMap (char const * output_file, MapFormat & format) Create and save distribution map to disk using the specified output format. Projection environment defaults to the same environment used during model creation and previously set by calling the setenvironment() method. Parameters: output_file Output file name. format Georeferenced map file which will define cell size, extent, WKT projection, no data value, and file type for the output map. void OpenModeller::createMap (const EnvironmentPtr & env, char const * output_file) Create and save distribution map to disk using the specified projection environment. Output format defaults to the output mask format. Parameters: env Pointer to Environment object with the layers to project the model onto. output_file Output file name.

107 void OpenModeller::createMap (const EnvironmentPtr & env, char const * output_file, MapFormat & format) Create and save distribution map to disk using the specified projection environment and output format. Parameters: env Pointer to Environment object with the layers to project the model onto. output_file Output file name. format Georeferenced map file which will define cell size, extent, WKT projection, no data value, and file type for the output map. int OpenModeller::createModel () Run the algorithm to create the model. char* OpenModeller::error () [inline] Definition at line 326 of file OpenModeller.hh.AreaStats* OpenModeller::getActualAreaStats () Returns a pointer to the model AreaStats object which contains statistics about areas on the map generated by OM. AlgorithmPtr OpenModeller::getAlgorithm () [inline] Returns the current algorithm setting. Returns: Pointer to algorithm. Definition at line 156 of file OpenModeller.hh.ConfigurationPtr OpenModeller::getConfiguration () const ConfusionMatrix* OpenModeller::getConfusionMatrix () EnvironmentPtr OpenModeller::getEnvironment () [inline] Returns the current environment related to model creation. Returns: Pointer to environment related to model creation. Definition at line 150 of file OpenModeller.hh.AreaStats* OpenModeller::getEstimatedAreaStats (const ConstEnvironmentPtr & env, double proportionareatosample = 0.01) AreaStats* OpenModeller::getEstimatedAreaStats (double proportionareatosample = 0.01) Returns a pointer to the model AreaStats object which contains statistics about areas on the map generated by OM. This one uses only a random sample of the data points to estimate prediction areas. Parameters: proportionareatosample Proportion of the area of interest (mask or intersection of all layers extents) to use as sample size. Model OpenModeller::getModel () [inline] Returns model created by the algorithm. Returns: Model object.

108 Definition at line 162 of file OpenModeller.hh.const SamplerPtr& OpenModeller::getSampler () const [inline] Returns current sampler setting. Returns: Pointer to sampler. Definition at line 168 of file OpenModeller.hh.Scalar OpenModeller::getValue (Scalar const * environment_values) Get prediction at a given point. Parameters: environment_values Vector with environment values. Returns: Prediction value at the specified point. Valid values range from 0.0 to 1.0. Value -1.0 means there is no prediction for that point (masked or not predicted) Scalar OpenModeller::getValue (const ConstEnvironmentPtr & env, Coord x, Coord y) Get prediction at a given point. Parameters: env Pointer to Environment class with the layers to get environmental values from. x X coordinate of point being queried y Y coordinate of point being queried Returns: Prediction value at the specified point. Valid values range from 0.0 to 1.0. Value -1.0 means there is no prediction for that point (masked or not predicted) char* OpenModeller::getVersion () Returns the openmodeller client interface version in the format "n.m" bool OpenModeller::hasEnvironment () [private] int OpenModeller::numAvailableAlgorithms () Number of available algorithms. If the algorithms are not already searched in the system, searchs them first. Returns: Number of available algorithms. char* OpenModeller::parameterModelCheck () [private] Check if all necessary parameters to create the model have been defined. If not, an error message is returned. int OpenModeller::run () [inline] Compatibility with old om client versions. Definition at line 305 of file OpenModeller.hh.int OpenModeller::setAlgorithm (char const * id, int nparam, AlgParameter const * param) Define algorithm that will be used to generate the model. Parameters: id Algorithm's identifier. Must match the Algorithm::getID() returned string. nparam Number of parameters. param Vector with all parameters. The address 'param' points to must exist when the method "run()" is called.

109 Returns: zero if something goes wrong like the algorithm ID does not exist, use different number of parameters, etc. void OpenModeller::setConfiguration (const ConstConfigurationPtr &) void OpenModeller::setEnvironment (std::vector< std::string > categ_map, std::vector< std::string > continuous_map, const std::string & mask) Defines environmental layers and the mask using STL arguments. Also creates the Environment object used for native range projection. Parameters: categ_map Vector of strings containing the file names of categorical map layers. continuous_map Vector of strings containing the file names of continuous map layers. mask File name of the mask map layer. void OpenModeller::setLogLevel (Log::Level level) Sets the log level on the global Log g_log object. Note: We need to add control over the log file and prefix as well. void OpenModeller::setMapCallback (MapCallback func, void * param = 0) Sets a callback function to be called after each map distribution line generation. Parameters: func Pointer to the callback function. param User parameter to be passed to the callback function. void OpenModeller::setMapCommand (Projector::MapCommand * func) Sets a callback function to be called after each map distribution line generation. Parameters: func Pointer to the callback function. void OpenModeller::setModelCallback (ModelCallback func, void * param = 0) Sets a callback function to be called after each iteration of the model creation. Parameters: func Pointer to the callback function. param User parameter to be passed to the callback function. void OpenModeller::setModelCommand (Algorithm::ModelCommand * func) Sets a callback function to be called after each iteration of the model creation. Parameters: func Pointer to the callback function. int OpenModeller::setOccurrences (const OccurrencesPtr & presence, const OccurrencesPtr & absence = OccurrencesPtr()) Define occurrence points to be used. Parameters: presence Occurrence points which the abundance attribute is not zero. absence Occurrence points which the abundance attribute is zero. void OpenModeller::setSampler (const SamplerPtr & sampler) Defines sampler to be used for modeling. Parameters: sampler Sampler object to be used for modeling

110 Annex 13

111

112

113

114 Annex 14 MAPCRIA - Generating dynamic maps on the web The initial developments of mapcria started during the specieslink 22 project, when the need for such a tool became very clear. The solution adopted is entirely based on MapServer, an open source package originally developed by the ForNet 23 project at the University of Minnesota (UMN) in cooperation with NASA and the Natural Resources Department (MNDNR) from the same University. This initiative is currently being maintained by the TerraSIP 24 project, funded by NASA and UMN. MapServer has been chosen for being open source, object of collaborative develpment, multi-platform, and also for coming with a library that could be used to develop specific applications targeted to our needs: the MapScript library. The main requirements included wrapping the MapScrip library to avoid changing all client applications after new MapScript releases, and also developing a generic map viewer that could be used on different environments (like Microsoft Internet Explorer and Mozilla-based browsers). A range of techniques have been studied to display maps, most of them still at early stages, some using Java Applets (like Rosa Applet). Although these ones seemed to have more features available, they came with slower performance and some compatibility problems related to different versions of Java virtual machines used by the browsers. It was therefore decided that the interface would be developed using only DHTML and JavaScript, without depending on Java. Final results included a web service, called mapcria web service, and a viewer, called mapcria viewer. The diagram below shows an overview of the basic interaction between all modules and components:

115 CGI script maps Web page Mapcria scripts Mapcria web service Mapcria Web Service Service used to prepare and manipulate maps on the web. The current version (3.0) makes use of the MapScript C library, more specifically the Perl SWIG wrapper from MapServer 4.2. It also uses the SOAP::Lite Perl library. Complete documentation can be found at: The mapcria web service is based on sessions. A normal session starts with a call to the draw function and is active for a time_to_live seconds (defaults to 600secs) of inactivity or until the finish function is called. An example of connection using Perl SOAP::Lite follows: #!/usr/bin/perl use SOAP::Lite; my $soap = SOAP::Lite -> uri("http://mapcria.cria.org.br/manager") -> proxy("http://mapcria.cria.org.br:59000/", timeout => 20) -> on_fault( sub { return undef } ); The main available methods are described below. draw Basic function that allows the definition of a map to be displayed. It takes an XML document as a parameter which defines all attributes of the map and returns a ticket identifying the session. This ticket can be used by other methods to change the display during interaction with users. The XML document used as input parameter is defined by this XML Schema:

116 Complete documentation can be found online 25. A simple example can be seen below: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?> <mapcria xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/xmlschema-instance" xsi:nonamespaceschemalocation="http://www.cria.org.br/schema/mapcria3.0.xsd"> <! access to this service depends on previous registration --> <user>user_identification</user> <! begin map definition --> <map id="mapa"> <! basic definitions, like map extent, image size, transparency, background color, etc. --> <set_defaults>sp</set_defaults> <set_extent>-53.11,-19.78,-42.69,-25.30</set_extent> <set_extent_text>false</set_extent_text> <set_image_background_color>0,204,255</set_image_background_color> <set_image_transparent>false</set_image_transparent> <set_image_width>160</set_image_width> <set_image_height>120</set_image_height> <! layer definitions abd its attributes like initial visibility, background color, etc. --> <layer id="brasil_uf"> <set_visibility>true</set_visibility> <set_fill_color>255,255,255</set_fill_color> </layer> <layer id="brasil_mun"> <set_visibility>false</set_visibility> </layer> <! definition of a polygon to be displayed at a given geographic coordinate --> <query_by_coord id="municipio"> <set_layer>brasil_mun</set_layer> <set_outline_color>255,0,0</set_outline_color> <set_symbol_color>255,0,0</set_symbol_color> <set_symbol>point</set_symbol> <set_symbol_size>8</set_symbol_size> <set_coords>-46.65,-23.55</set_coords> </query_by_coord> <! definition of a set of points to be displayed and their attributes (global or individual). --> <points id="servers"> <set_title>servidor Regional</set_title> <set_projection>proj=longlat</set_projection> <set_symbol>triangle</set_symbol> <set_symbol_size>10</set_symbol_size> <set_symbol_color>0,255,0</set_symbol_color> <! definition of point labels --> <label> <set_font_color>0,0,255</set_font_color> <set_force>true</set_force> <set_position>auto</set_position> <set_font>arial</set_font> <set_font_size>8</set_font_size> </label> <! definition of points --> <point> <set_coords> , </set_coords> <set_symbol_color>0,0,255</set_symbol_color> <set_label>splink</set_label> </point> <point> <set_coords>-46.65,-23.55</set_coords> <set_symbol_color>0,153,0</set_symbol_color> <set_label>sr São Paulo</set_label> </point> <point> <set_coords> , </set_coords> <set_symbol_color>0,153,0</set_symbol_color> 25

117 </point> <point> </point> </points> </map> </mapcria> <set_label>sr Ilha Solteira</set_label> <set_coords>-47.82,-21.2</set_coords> <set_symbol_color>0,153,0</set_symbol_color> <set_label>sr Ribeirão Preto</set_label> Once initiated, the map can be manipulated by the following methods (only the main ones are described): get_metadata Returns data about the available layers. get_image_width get_image_height Returns image width and height, in pixels, for the map to be displayed. get_image Returns the image generated by the service according to the current map definitions. get_extent Returns current map extension (top, left, right, bottom). get_scalebar Returns a scalebar for the map. get_reference Returns a reference map showing the area being displayed. zoom_point zoom_rectangle zoom_coords zoom_all Zooming operations given a point and a factor. finish Ends the service. The map will not be available after calling this function. toogle_layer Displays or hides a layer. Set_visibility Defines if an object (layer, set of points, etc.) should be visible or not. get_field_value_by_coord Returns layer data at a specific coordinate. For instance, county name. Mapcria Viewer 3.0 The mapcria viewer can be seen as a set of applications (CGI scripts) written in Perl and capable of interacting with the mapcria service through an Internet browser, allowing a user to interact with the service. In a certain sense, it wraps the service interface making its methods directly available through a browser. The main module is responsible for creating the web page where the map will be displayed to the user, and also for generating the respective JavaScript code. This code is dynamically generated according to the map features and to the user s environment (type of web browser, version, operating system, screen resolution, etc.)

118 The main application initializes the map on the server through an XML that defines its initial attributes, and then calls the viewer passing the necessary parameters so that it can assume control of the interaction. After that, the mapcria viewer modules can keep the interaction with the user in a generic way. The main module makes use of several scripts available through HTTP to interact with the service and carry out simple tasks like zooming (in/out), activating and deactivating layers, changing between different pre-defined scenarios, etc. Image 1: mapcria viewer used by SinBiota Atlas

119 Image 2: Displaying the geographic distribution of all specimens from a fish collection Image 3: Zooming in

120 Image 4: Example of a layer selection (viewer 2.0) Image 5: Result after zooming in and selecting layers

121 Annex 15

122 RESUMO A modelagem matemática aliada às ferramentas computacionais gera a possibilidade da previsão de ocorrência de espécies através da geração de superfícies temáticas, indicando presença ou ausência, com os chamados modelos de distribuição de espécies (Species Distribution Models, SDM). Baseados na quantificação da relação entre a espécie com o seu meio, os modelos de distribuição geram previsões indicando habitats adequados, ou inadequados, para a ocorrência de uma espécie. Constitui-se assim em uma ferramenta útil para planejamento ambiental, uma vez que permite determinar, por exemplo, regiões potenciais para a conservação de espécies raras e ameaçadas, ou ainda os locais adequados para reintrodução de espécies. Contudo, os dados de ocorrência e ausência utilizados para alimentar, calibrar e avaliar os SDM raramente são coletados com esse objetivo, e assim apresentam frequentemente imprecisão na localização do ponto de amostragem. Apenas recentemente o sistema de posicionamento global (GPS) passou a ser empregado para aquisição de dados biológicos, fornecendo posicionamento mais preciso do ponto de coleta. Este trabalho tem por objetivo avaliar a sensibilidade dos modelos de distribuição de espécies quanto à qualidade dos dados de coleta, buscando identificar os métodos de modelagem menos sensíveis aos possíveis erros e imprecisões de localização dos pontos de ocorrência utilizados. Apresenta-se uma revisão dos principais métodos para modelagem de distribuição de espécies e a proposta metodológica para cumprir este objetivo. Após a construção dos modelos, utilizando os métodos BIOCLIM, ENFA, GLM, GARP e Maxent, e a aplicação destes sobre os dados de coleta, considerando os erros de posicionamento mais freqüentes, será possível avaliar a sensibilidade destes métodos às imprecisões de posicionamento das coletas. Espera-se desta forma contribuir para que a questão dos erros de posicionamento dos pontos de coleta seja incorporada ao processo de modelagem de distribuição de espécies, enriquecendo a capacidade preditiva e a confiabilidade dos modelos.

123 SUMÁRIO Pág. CAPÍTULO 1 INTRODUÇÃO Objetivos.. 03 CAPÍTULO 2 FUNDAMENTAÇÃO TEÓRICA Tipos de modelos de distribuição de espécies Escala de estudo Escolha das variáveis Dados de pseudo-ausência Avaliação do modelo 14 CAPITULO 3 METODOLOGIA Formulação do modelo conceitual Construção do banco de dados Ajuste do modelo Avaliação do modelo 21 CRONOGRAMA.. 23 REFERÊNCIAS BIBLIOGRÁFICAS 24

124 LISTA DE FIGURAS FIGURA 1 Elementos essenciais na modelagem de distribuição de espécies.05 FIGURA 2 Número de ocorrências de E. alpinumem em diferentes resoluções.. 12 FIGURA 3 Organograma dos procedimentos a serem adotados.. 18 FIGURA 4 Área sob a curva vs correlação para os métodos de modelagem. 21

125 CAPÍTULO 1 INTRODUÇÃO A preocupação com a quantificação da relação da distribuição espacial de espécies com fatores bióticos e abióticos tem uma longa história na ecologia, e a modelagem matemática tem sido uma das principais ferramentas empregadas para medir e prever essa relação (Phillips et al., 2006; Rushton et al., 2004; Guisan e Zimmermann, 2000). Entender, modelar e prever a ocorrência de espécies é essencial para os estudos de perda de biodiversidade ou avaliação de risco ambiental. Baseados na quantificação da relação espécie com o seu meio, os modelos de distribuição geram previsões indicando habitats adequados, ou inadequados, para a ocorrência de uma espécie alvo, determinando assim regiões em potencial para a conservação de espécies raras ou ameaçadas (Engler et al., 2004) além de determinar os melhores locais para reintrodução de espécies (Hirzel et al., 2002). No Brasil, são necessárias respostas rápidas para problemas relacionados à políticas ambientais, como a escolha de áreas prioritárias para a conservação. E para que tais decisões possam ser tomadas sobre uma base sólida de conhecimento, é necessário o desenvolvimento de instrumentos, com acurácia e incertezas mensuráveis, que auxiliem no tratamento dos dados disponíveis e na geração de informações a partir deles (Siqueira, 2005). A modelagem matemática aliada às ferramentas computacionais gera a possibilidade da previsão de ocorrência de espécies através da geração de superfícies temáticas, indicando presença ou ausência, com os chamados modelos de distribuição de espécies (Species Distribution Models, SDM). Tais modelos são empíricos, pois relacionam observações de campo com variáveis ambientais explicativas, fundamentadas em premissas estatísticas ou teóricas gerando o temático de saída (Guisan e Thuiller, 2005). Variáveis ambientais podem exercer efeitos diretos ou indiretos sobre as espécies, e devem ser escolhidas de modo a representar os principais fatores que influenciam as espécies: a) fatores limitantes (ou reguladores) que são definidos como fatores que controlam a eco-fisiologia (temperatura, água, composição do solo, por exemplo); b) distúrbios, são qualquer perturbação que afete os sistemas ambientais; c) e recursos, que são todos os componentes que são assimilados pelos organismos (Guisan e Thuiller, 2005; Guisan e Zimmermann, 2000). Os dados de ocorrência e ausência utilizados para alimentar, calibrar e avaliar os SDM raramente são coletados com esse objetivo, se configurando como um primeiro e talvez o maior, empecilho da modelagem (Rushton et al., 2004). Embora existam grandes bancos de dados biológicos armazenados, estes geralmente foram adquiridos sem uma estratégia de coleta pré-definida. Dados em museus e herbários apresentam frequentemente imprecisão na localização do ponto de amostragem, muitas vezes indicando apenas proximidade a um ponto de referência, como uma vila ou um rio em uma escala de

126 kilômetros ou mais (Engler et al., 2004). E apenas recentemente o sistema de posicionamento global (GPS) passou a ser empregado para coleta de dados biológicos, sendo o método com maior acurácia para o posicionamento do ponto de coleta. A coleta de dados ambientais para modelagem de distribuição de espécies sofreu uma grande mudança na década de 90 quando imagens de sensoriamento remoto se tornaram amplamente acessíveis. Estas acompanhadas do crescimento do uso de sistemas de informação geográfica (SIG), para armazenar e trabalhar dados espaciais, levaram a uma expansão no uso de SDM. O sensoriamento remoto também tornou possível o estudo de áreas mais extensas e de locais de difícil acesso (Guisan e Thuiller, 2005; Rushton, et al., 2004), sendo uma fonte alternativa de dados para um país de tamanha dimensão territorial como o Brasil. O estudo e a caracterização de habitats através de imagens orbitais têm sido realizados apenas nos últimos anos e as variáveis potencialmente explicativas mais utilizadas até o momento foram climáticas e meteorológicas, topográficas e de uso e ocupação do solo (Hirzel et al., 2002; Zaniewski et al., 2002; Guisan et al., 1999). Estes modelos são geralmente baseados em muitas hipóteses de como os fatores ambientais controlam a distribuição espacial de espécies e de comunidades (Guisan e Zimmermann, 2000). Surge daí uma necessidade de imagens com uma calibração radiométrica de qualidade, que é essencial para a caracterização dos alvos na superfície terrestre. Embora trabalhos recentes tenham avaliado a performance e a sensibilidade dos diversos modelos disponíveis (Elith et al., 2006; Phillips et al., 2006; Segurado e Araújo, 2004), a influência que a qualidade do posicionamento dos dados tem sobre a resposta dos SDM não foram avaliados, e esta é a maior contribuição deste trabalho. Assim, este trabalho se propõe a testar a hipótese que os SDM são sensíveis a qualidade do posicionamento dos dados de entrada. Caso a hipótese não seja refutada, ou seja, a precisão dos posicionamentos possa influenciar os modelos, e consequentemente os mapas de ocorrência resultantes, surge a questão de quais modelos são mais sensíveis e quão grande é a influência da qualidade de posicionamento nos resultados em cada um Objetivos O objetivo geral deste trabalho é avaliar a sensibilidade dos modelos de distribuição de espécies quanto à qualidade dos dados de coleta, buscando identificar os métodos de modelagem menos sensíveis aos possíveis erros de localização dos pontos de ocorrência utilizados. Os objetivos específicos são: 1. Avaliar a sensibilidade dos modelos à qualidade, em relação à localização, dos dados de coleta, i.e. determinar o quanto os erros na localização dos dados de entrada influenciam as respostas nos diversos modelos. 2. Construir uma tipologia de modelos com base na sensibilidade dos modelos aos dados de entrada e a escala espacial dos dados biológicos.

127 O problema não é a comparação da perfomance de modelos, pois existem trabalhos recentes que tratam essa questão, mas sim avaliar a sensibilidade de cada um dos modelos em relação a qualidade do posicionamento e posteriormente categoriza-los em relação a sua sensibilidade. Desse modo pretende-se contribuir para que a questão dos erros de localização dos pontos de coleta seja incorporada ao processo de modelagem de distribuição de espécies, enriquecendo a capacidade preditiva e a confiabilidade dos modelos. Este trabalho está inserido em dois projetos institucionais: a Rede Temática de Pesquisa em Modelagem da Amazônia (GEOMA) e o OpenModeller/CRIA/INPE nos quais a OBT/INPE vem atuando. O objetivo do projeto GEOMA é desenvolver modelos computacionais capazes de predizer a dinâmica dos sistemas ecológicos e sócio-econômicos em diferentes escalas geográficas, dentro do conceito de sustentabilidade; auxiliar a tomada de decisão nos níveis local, regional e nacional, ao fornecer ferramentas de simulação e modelagem; contribuir na formação de recursos humanos (http://www.geoma.lncc.br/, acesso em 06/02/2006). O OpenModeller é uma ferramenta de código aberto para modelagem estatística de distribuição espacial (http://openmodeller.cria.org.br, acesso em 18/02/2006) em desenvolvimento pela equipe do CRIA. O projeto OpenModeller, financiado pela Fapesp, que além do CRIA e da Escola Politécnica da USP (POLI), tem parceria com o INPE, que participa desenvolvendo ferramentas para o arcabouço computacional e realizará testes para validação dos modelos para diferentes áreas.

128 CAPÍTULO 2 FUNDAMENTAÇÃO TEÓRICA Segundo Guisan e Zimmermann (2000) existem três pilares no estudo de modelos matemáticos aplicados a ecologia: generalidade, realidade e precisão. Desses são derivados três grupos de modelos, onde em cada grupo dois desses aspectos devem ser enfocados em detrimento do terceiro. O primeiro grupo foca a generalidade e a precisão, esses modelos são chamados de analíticos. São desenvolvidos para prever um cenário acuradamente dentro de uma realidade simplificada e limitada. As equações de crescimento populacional logístico e as de Lotka-Volterra são exemplos. O segundo grupo é desenvolvido visando ser realista e generalista, são chamados de mecanicistas, fisiológico, casuais ou modelos de processos e suas previsões são baseadas nas relações reais de causa e efeito. São considerados generalistas, porque estes relacionamentos são considerados funcionais biologicamente. O terceiro grupo sacrifica a generalidade pela precisão e realidade, são os chamados modelos empíricos, estatísticos ou fenomenológicos. Os SDM são geralmente encaixados nessa categoria. Todos os estudos que envolvem SDM possuem três componentes básicos (FIGURA 1): a) um conjunto de dados descrevendo a incidência ou abundância de espécies e outro conjunto contendo as variáveis explicativas; b) um modelo matemático que relaciona a espécie com a variável explicativa; c) a avaliação da utilidade do modelo através de validação ou por modelos de robustez (Rushton et al., 2004; Guisan e Zimmermann, 2000). No mundo ideal a espécie alvo de estudo do SDM deveria ser sedentária e estar em um ponto fixo no espaço, além de seus requisitos ambientais serem bem conhecidos e mensuráveis espaço-temporalmente. Neste ponto já encontramos vários empecilhos, pois medir variáveis potencialmente preditivas pode ser difícil e os fatores ambientais que influenciam na distribuição dessa espécie podem ser desconhecidos ou não mensuráveis. E ainda, dados de flora geralmente são mais fáceis de coletar que dados de fauna, pois estes apresentam uma grande dificuldade, a locomoção dos indivíduos. Outro problema com dados diz respeito às espécies raras para as quais métodos convencionais de amostragem não são eficazes, ou então, simplesmente a coleta é muito difícil porque há poucos indivíduos para amostrar (Rushton et al., 2004). Um conceito importante é o de registro zero, ou ausência, locais onde os pesquisadores procuraram por indivíduos da espécie estudada, mas não acharam nada, ou seja, a espécie está ausente (Engler et al., 2004). Dados de ausência são mais difíceis de obter

129 acuradamente. Em um dado local pode ser registrada a ausência da espécie por diferentes motivos: a) a espécie não pode ser detectada, embora presente; b) por razões históricas a espécie está ausente, embora o habitat seja adequado; c) o habitat é realmente inadequado para a espécie (Phillips et al., 2006). Esse tipo de dado é particularmente precioso, porém escasso. Alguns autores vêm contornando esse problema utilizando dados de pseudo-ausência simulados para a modelagem (Engler et al., 2004) Tipos de modelos de distribuição de espécies Há uma grande variedade de técnicas de modelagem para explorar a relação entre a resposta (ocorrência de espécies) e as variáveis ambientais preditivas. Neste trabalho, pela dificuldade de acesso aos dados de ausência, apenas modelos de presença serão enfocados. Elith et al. (2006) classificam os SDM em dois grandes grupos baseados nos tipos de dados que alimentam os modelos, aqueles que utilizam apenas registros de presença (envelopes climáticos, por exemplo), e os que empregam dados de presença e ausência da espécie alvo, de modo a limitar as áreas de ocorrência, diminuindo erros de falsos positivos. O segundo grupo pode ser dividido em dois subgrupos, aqueles que utilizam dados de apenas uma espécie e os que descrevem a presença da espécie alvo através de dados de presença de outras espécies, isto é, da comunidade. A TABELA 1 apresenta os diversos modelos e softwares disponíveis, entretanto foram selecionados apenas alguns softwares de diferentes categorias, para serem empregados neste trabalho. Uma descrição dos modelos que serão utilizados segue abaixo. Métodos de envelopes bioclimáticos Segundo Guisan e Zimmermann (2000), até recentemente, muitos modelos de distribuição de vegetação foram baseados técnica de envelopes ambientais. Envelopes bioclimáticos predizem locais com condições climáticas favoráveis a uma espécie baseados no cálculo de um envelope retilíneo mínimo no espaço climático multidimensional. E um envelope retilíneo pode ser definido como uma árvore de classificação, que consiste em uma partição recursiva do espaço multidimensional definido por variáveis explicativas (VE) dentro de grupos que são os mais homogêneos possíveis em termos de sensibilidade. São exemplos destes modelos o BIOCLIM, o DOMAIN e o LIVES. Métodos que utilizam dados de presença e supõem ausência Esta categoria de modelos utiliza além dos dados de presença, as variáveis ambientais explicativas e diferentes técnicas de regressão para a previsão de ocorrência. Neste grupo se encaixam a maioria dos modelos empregados atualmente, Boosted decision tree (BRT), AG (algoritmos genéticos), modelo linear aditivo (GAM), modelo linear

130 generalizado (GLM), modelo de dissimilaridade generalizado para apenas uma espécie (GDS-SS), redes neurais (NNETW), ecological niche factor analysis (ENFA), máxima entropia (Maxent).

131 O modelo linear generalizado é uma extensão da regressão linear múltipla clássica que permite variáveis sem normalidade serem modeladas (Engler et al., 2004). A seleção das VE (e suas possíveis transformações com termos polinomiais, por exemplo) é certamente a mais importante e difícil etapa do ajuste do GLM (Guisan et al., 2002). Como o número de combinações é muito grande para testar todos eles, somente através do stepwise é possível encontrar a melhor combinação que oferece o melhor ajuste em um conjunto grande de dados com muitas variáveis (Engler et al., 2004; Netter et al., 1996). O GLM geralmente constitui uma escolha preferencial porque pode lidar com muitos tipos de VE (contínuo, binário, qualitativo, ordinal), mas por outro lado precisa também de dados de presença e ausência. Para utilizá-lo sem disponibilidade de dados de ausência é possível gerar dados de pseudo-ausências para alimentar os modelos (Engler et al., 2004; Segurado e Araújo, 2004). O GARP (Genetic Algorithm for Rule Set Production) é um modelo que define o nicho através de um conjunto de regras que são selecionadas através de um algoritmo genético. O GARP opera sobre o conjunto de regras, realizando uma seleção natural, excluindo regras menos eficientes e criando novos conjuntos de regras a partir de indivíduos sobreviventes (Siqueira, 2005). Cada realização do GARP é uma possibilidade com componentes aleatórias onde cada realização é distinta, o resultado é um somatório dos resultados de várias realizações do mesmo modelo. Há uma versão disponível com interface gráfica, o DK-GARP (Desktop Garp) e uma versão para o OpenModeller, o OM-GARP (OpenModeller GARP). De acordo com Phillips et al. (2006) a máxima entropia (Maxent) é um método para realizar previsões ou inferências a partir de informações incompletas. É aplicado em diversas áreas, astronomia, reconstrução de imagens, física estatística e processamento de sinal. A idéia da aplicação do Maxent para SDM é estimar a probabilidade de ocorrência da espécie encontrando a distribuição de probabilidade da máxima entropia, sujeita a um conjunto de restrições que representam a informação incompleta sobre a distribuição do alvo. A informação disponível sobre a distribuição da espécie constitui se um conjunto de valores tomados como verdades de campo, chamados feições, e suas restrições são os valores esperados de cada feição que devem corresponder com as médias empíricas (valor médio para um conjunto de pontos tomados da distribuição do alvo). O ENFA é um método baseado na comparação entre o nicho de uma espécie e as características do meio ambiente de toda a área de estudo, armazenadas em planos de informação de um SIG (Hirzel et al., 2002). Desse modo, o ENFA necessita apenas de dados de presença e do conjunto de VE ambientais no SIG (Engler et al., 2004). Este método é similar a análise de componentes principais (PCA), que também transforma as variáveis ecogeográficas em novos eixos descorrelacionados. Contudo, enquanto os sucessivos eixos da PCA selecionam as direções de maior variância, no espaço Ndimensional das variáveis ecogeográficas as componentes principais possuem uma verdadeira interpretação para as espécies modeladas. A primeira componente é chamada

132 fator de marginalidade, e passa através do centróide de todas as observações da espécie (ótimo multidimensional) e pelo centróide das células das VE na área de estudo. Assim, um alto valor de marginalidade indica que os requisitos da espécie diferem consideravelmente das condições de um habitat médio na área de estudo (Engler et al., 2004). Modelos baseados na comunidade Os Modelos Generalizados de dissimilaridade (GDM) modelam o volume espacial na composição da comunidade entre pares de locais como uma função das diferenças ambientais entre estes locais. Este método combina elementos da matriz de regressão e dos GLM, permitindo respostas não lineares do ambiente que captura relações realistas ecologicamente entre a dissimilaridade e a distância ecológica (Elith et al.,2006). Pertencem a este grupo o próprio GDM e o Multivariate adaptative regression splines for communities (MARS-COMM) Escala de estudo Um problema presente na modelagem de distribuição está na identificação da escala apropriada para a amostragem. Geralmente é feita em unidades em forma de células cujo tamanho normalmente não tem relação com aspectos ecológicos ou de significância para a espécie (Rushton et al., 2004). Um primeiro possível engano pode ocorrer entre a precisão com que os dados são amostrados e como as variáveis explicativas estão disponíveis. Ambos deveriam ser as mesmas, mas essa coerência geralmente não é possível. Por exemplo, imagens de satélites estão acessíveis para a maior parte da superfície do planeta, e a utilidade de tais dados para modelagem é determinada pela ecologia da espécie alvo que por sua vez, tem que ser compatível com a resolução do sensor. Como dados derivados de satélites, tipicamente, possuem uma resolução fixa e, tal como a maioria dos dados biológica, não foi coletada especificamente para modelagem de distribuição de espécies, em muitos casos as imagens são apenas empregadas como substitutas para as variáveis que alimentam os SDM (Rushton et al., 2004). Ao definir o tamanho da célula deve levar em consideração também outros aspectos, uma célula grande resulta em dados mais simples de tratar, mas em contrapartida, caso exista autocorrelação, os dados não podem ser agregados em uma célula maior, pois não são independentes. Em contraste uma resolução espacial mais fina pode representar melhor os processos ecológicos (Engler et al., 2004). Segundo Guisan e Thuiller (2005), a ocorrência de organismos sésseis, como plantas podem ser melhor inferidas com resoluções espaciais finas. Assim, VE locais têm mais poder explicativo e ao contrário de organismos móveis, dados de ausências podem ser muito mais verdadeiros e importantes neste caso. Exceto nos casos que a flora tenha flutuações interanuais em sua ocorrência.

133 Padrões observados em uma escala podem não aparecer em outra, esta restrição pode levar a interpretações incorretas se apenas uma parte de um importante gradiente ambiental não for amostrada (Guisan e Thuiller, 2005). Assim, para determinar otamanho da área de estudo é preciso ter um conhecimento a priori dos gradientes de toda a área de estudo para que possam ser evitados problemas de autocorrelação, caso o modelo pressuponha independência, por exemplo (Austin, 2002). Caso exista autocorrelação, é possível determinar o intervalo de amostragem com o estudo do variograma da variável com base no alcance do semivariograma experimental. Dados de precisão espacial variável podem ser manipulados para evitar erros de medida no modelo, agregando todos os dados em grades regulares com resolução espacial que seja compatível com a pior precisão encontrada nos dados coletados ou descartando os dados com baixa acuidade. Um balanço entre tamanho amostral e precisão pode ser obtido entre as duas opções. A FIGURA 2 ilustra que o número de ocorrências da espécie Eryngium alpinumem cai quando a resolução espacial aumenta (Engler et al., 2004). Como a modelagem deve ser baseada em dados coletados em campo, e devido aos custos de coleta e a logística, muitos conjuntos de dados são coletados em pequenas áreas ou regiões de fácil acesso, como rios ou locais próximos a estradas. Nesses casos os dados inevitavelmente não são representativos espacialmente, além disso, é possível que os dados apresentem autocorrelação ou outra forma de não independência (Rushton et al., 2004), sendo necessária a realização de um estudo detalhado sobre esta questão antes da montagem do banco de dados.

134 2.3. Escolha das variáveis Um aspecto comum aos SDM é que geralmente existem muitas variáveis potencialmente preditivas. O excesso de variáveis pode parecer vantajoso para um não estatístico, contudo, estas podem estar correlacionadas ou não aumentarem significativamente a explicação sobre a variação dos dados. Para contornar esse problema e eliminar variáveis, uma alternativa é utilizar o método stepwise forward ou backward (Netter et al., 1996). Outras abordagens para a modelagem como a CART, NNETW, algoritmos genéticos ou análise bayesiana possuem seus próprios critérios para a seleção das variáveis (Guisan e Thuiller, 2005) Dados de Pseudo-ausência A maneira como a pseudo-ausência é gerada é importante, pois pode ser significativamente influente na qualidade final do modelo. E a maneira mais simples de gerar dados de pseudo-ausência é apenas gerá-los aleatoriamente sobre a área de estudo (Zaniewski et al., 2002). Contudo, existe o risco deste método gerar dados de ausência em locais na realidade favoráveis a espécie alvo, causando erros de falsas ausências (TABELA 2, item c). Uma opção para gerar pseudo-ausências é combinar os métodos ENFA e GLM. É uma abordagem mais trabalhosa, mas utiliza os critérios do ENFA ao invés do GLM com pseudo-ausências, totalmente aleatórios, para calcular o primeiro mapa de habitats da espécie alvo que é utilizado para pesar a seleção das pseudo-ausências (Engler et al., 2004) Avaliação do modelo A maior utilidade dos modelos é evidenciada quando podem ser utilizados como ferramentas preditivas (e.g. para a seleção de áreas prioritárias para conservação) e não simplesmente meios de explorar relações entre os conjuntos de dados (Rushton et al., 2004). Modelos podem ser avaliados qualitativamente ou quantitativamente. Avaliações qualitativas medem o quão bem os modelos se encaixam nos dados e quantitativas medem o quão bem os modelos predizem eventos reais (Engler et al., 2004). O método tradicionalmente utilizado para avaliação de todos os modelos lineares é o teste de hipóteses, para verificar se os coeficientes de regressão das variáveis preditivas são significativamente diferentes de zero (Rushton et al., 2004). A TABELA 2 apresenta a proporção de acertos e possíveis erros associados à previsão dos modelos. Os itens a e d são os verdadeiros positivos e verdadeiros negativos, i.e. as presenças e ausências preditas corretamente. Os possíveis erros dos modelos são

135 os falsos positivos e falsos negativos, itens b e c respectivamente, que também são representações dos erros tipo I e II. Segurado e Araújo (2004) apresentam uma análise através da análise de sensibilidade e da estatística kappa. Sensibilidade do modelo é baseada no conceito de erros de classificação de presenças estimadas (falsas negativas ou erro tipo II, item c da TABELA 2) e é calculado como a porcentagem de falsas negativas (Fielding e Bell, 1997). O número de falsas negativas é particularmente útil porque mede o número de resíduos, ou variância não explicada dos dados; quanto maior o número de falsas negativas, menos os modelos são realistas. (Segurado e Araújo, 2004). Modelos de distribuição de espécies são úteis quando são robustos (alta probabilidade de que as hipóteses nulas sejam corretamente rejeitadas, ou seja, erro tipo II baixo). Responder questões ecológicas com um modelo que é estatisticamente significante, mas que explica apenas uma baixa proporção da variância pode levar a conclusões fracas e possivelmente erradas (Guisan e Thuiller, 2005). Em contraste, um modelo baseado em envelopes climáticos pode, hipoteticamente, ter um baixo goodness-of-fit (e.g. R2 = 0,2), e ainda explicar bem a variância relacionada ao clima da espécie alvo. Um modelo assim é suficiente para avaliar globalmente o impacto de mudanças climáticas sobre a distribuição de espécies, mas não responder uma pergunta específica de gerenciamento e conservação em uma escala local (Guisan e Thuiller, 2005). Guisan e Zimmermann (2000) apresenta duas abordagens para a avaliação do modelo: calibrar o modelo e realizar a validação cruzada, Jack-knife (leave-one-out) ou bootstrap;ou utilizar dois conjuntos independentes de dados, um para calibrar e outro para validar, como também é feito no processo de regressão linear múltipla (Netter et al., 1996). O emprego da validação cruzada, do Jack-knife ou bootstrap é mais adequado quando o conjunto de dados é demasiado pequeno para separá-lo em dado de calibração e dado de avaliação. O método bootstrap é uma técnica de re-amostragem que permite investigar a tendência de uma estimativa através da realização de múltiplas re-amostragens (com reposição) dentro do conjunto de dados de calibração, que então o remove para obter uma estimativa não tendenciosa (Guisan e Zimmermann, 2000). Outra opção para a avaliação de GLMs é o chamado gráfico do receptor-operador

136 (ROC-plot) onde são representados em um gráfico as frações dos verdadeiros positivos contras os falsos negativos. (a e b na TABELA 2 respectivamente). A área sob a curva é tomada como uma medida de acurácia do modelo (Phillips et al., 2005; Rushton et al., 2004). Existem algumas outras medidas que podem ser empregadas para avaliar a previsão dos modelos e os dados observados que são apresentadas abaixo. D 2 ajustado É a porcentagem de desvio (i.e. variância) explicada pelo GLM. Esta medida expressa o ajuste do modelo, com pesos atribuídos pelo número efetivo de graus de liberdade, i.e. levando em consideração o número das VE e do número de observações, utilizados para construir o modelo (Engler, et al., 2004). Melhor índice kappa (B-kappa) O coeficiente kappa pode ser calculado para muitos limiares entre zero e um com incrementos de 0,05. O maior valor é mantido como melhor valor kappa. Esta medida expressa a melhor concordância possível não obtida aleatoriamente entre duas variáveis qualitativas, que é uma variável binária nesse caso em particular (Engler et al., 2004). Coeficiente Gini É a transformação do valor da área sob a curva obtida através do método do gráfico do receptor-operador característico. O coeficiente Gini é utilizado para descrever dados díspares que chegam. Geralmente varia entre zero (para um modelo pouco informativo) e um (para um modelo que descreve perfeitamente o fenômeno), mas pode excepcionalmente ser negativo para casos onde o modelo tenha tendência a fazer previsões altas em locais de ausência (Engler et al., 2004). Área mínima estimada A área mínima estimada é a mínima superfície obtida considerando todos os pixels com previsões acima de um limiar de probabilidade (e.g. 0,7) que ainda engloba 90% de ocorrência da espécie. Ao avaliar um mapa de habitats com dados de apenas presenças, um mapa indicando ocorrência por todas as partes possuiria a melhor avaliação, contudo um mapa tão otimista seria inútil. Assim, a idéia por trás da área mínima estimada é baseada na premissa que um bom mapa de habitat obtido a partir de dados com apenas presença deveria prever áreas com potencial de ocorrência as menores possíveis enquanto inclui um número máximo de ocorrência de espécies ao mesmo tempo (Engler et al., 2004). Após comparar seis métodos para modelar a distribuição espacial de 44 espécies de anfíbios e répteis, Segurado e Araújo (2004) discutem que dificilmente será encontrado o melhor modelo, pois cada método possui pontos fortes, bem como fraquezas. A escolha do método apropriado depende dos dados, das premissas e dos objetivos.

137 Segundo estes autores, isso deixa duas alternativas para os pesquisadores: utilizar um sistema especialista (GARP, por exemplo) que compara métodos automaticamente e escolhe o melhor método para cada espécie ou um método que é mais robusto genericamente (como o GLM) ou; a segunda opção é escolher um método que é robusto particularmente para o tipo de dados e o objetivo do trabalho. A primeira estratégia procura otimizar o ajuste de modelos de acordo com os dados disponíveis. É um processo orientado pelos dados onde nenhuma hipótese é feita a priori sobre os dados e a natureza da espécie. A segunda abordagem garante resultados razoáveis guardando certa responsabilidade ao pesquisador no que diz respeito às premissas do modelo serem aplicadas as espécies modeladas (Segurado e Araújo, 2004).

138 CAPÍTULO 3 METODOLOGIA Segundo Guisan e Zimmermann (2000), o procedimento para a construção de SDM pode ser dividido em cinco passos: a) formulação do modelo conceitual; b) preparação dos dados; c) ajuste do modelo ou calibração; d) previsão de ocorrência; e) avaliação do modelo. Trabalhos recentes (Guisan e Thuiller, 2005; Vargas et al., 2004; Segurado e Araújo, 2004; Zaniewski et al., 2002) têm adotado estas etapas (FIGURA 3), assim, também serão aplicadas neste trabalho Com a posse dos dados, na primeira fase define-se: o modelo conceitual do sistema a ser simulado; as hipóteses de trabalho; a relevância das variáveis ambientais explicativas na escala determinada para o trabalho; caso necessário, uma estratégia para coleta de novos dados tomando cuidado com a escala e resolução espaço-temporal necessárias; o método mais apropriado para modelar a resposta à VE; e quais métricas serão utilizadas para avaliar o modelo (Guisan e Thuiller, 2005). Contudo, na prática, poucas decisões são tomadas logo no início do estudo. Devido à falta de conhecimento sobre a espécie alvo, sobre a área de estudo ou mesmo sobre os dados a serem trabalhados (Guisan e Thuiller, 2005).

139 3.1. Formulação do modelo conceitual Seleção da espécie e das variáveis potencialmente explicativas Os dados de ocorrência serão fornecidos pelo projeto GEOMA ou pelo projeto de validação do OpenModeller. Caso os dados não estejam disponíveis, os dados serão levantados junto a herbários de universidades e institutos de pesquisas. Como variáveis explicativas serão sistematizados: 1. Dados climáticos e meteorológicos, obtidos junto ao CPTEC/INPE (Centro de Previsão de Tempo e Estudos Climáticos); 2. Variáveis de relevo declividade, Modelo digital de elevação (MDE) do SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission). Ppode ser retirado do site da JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, ftp://e0srp01u.ecs.nasa.gov/srtm) e pode ser baixado gratuitamente; 3. Variáveis categóricas solo, geologia, geomorfologia, vegetação; 4. Produtos e imagens de sensoriamento remoto do sensor MODIS índice de vegetação, temperatura da superfície terrestre e reflectância de superfície. Podem ser baixados do site após o registro do usuário. Seleção da área de estudo e da escala espacial do trabalho A escolha da resolução apropriada depende também do conhecimento sobre a ecologia da espécie e como a mesma utiliza os recurso do meio (Guisan e Thuiller, 2005). A área de estudo será definida de acordo com a disponibilidade e adequabilidade dos dados aos objetivos deste trabalho. E uma escala apropriada para a modelagem depende dos dados de entrada. Caso necessários dados de resolução fina podem ser degradados para serem compatíveis com dados em escalas menores. Seleção do modelo O modelo a ser utilizado deve trabalhar com dados de presença e sem dados de ausência, devido ao fato que os dados disponíveis geralmente provém de herbários ou museus e raramente são registradas as ausências. Logo, serão preferencialmente trabalhados o BIOCLIM, o ENFA, o GLM, o GARP (também inclui envelopes bioclimáticos e GLM) e o Maxent que trabalham com dados de pseudo-ausência. A escolha destes aplicativos para a execução dos modelos também se deve ao fato que, de acordo com Elith et al. (2006), estes se encaixam em diferentes categorias de desempenho de acordo com o ROC-plot (FIGURA 4), além de estarem disponíveis na internet.

140 3.2. Construção do banco de dados O banco de dados será construído no Terraview, de modo que os dados de variáveis explicativas e ocorrência estejam em formatos adaptáveis aos diferentes softwares para os modelos. Na inexistência de dados de ausência, serão gerados dados de pseudoausência seguindo os dois métodos indicados na seção 2.4: o de geração aleatória (Zaniewski et al., 2002) e a geração combinada com o ENFA (Engler et al., 2004). Caso não exista uma classificação da qualidade dos dados a priori, serão simuladas diferentes situações, introduzindo erros de posicionamento Ajuste do modelo Calibração é o ajuste dos parâmetros e constantes do modelo para melhorar a concordância entre a saída do modelo e o conjunto de dados, ou seja, esta etapa tem o objetivo de aumentar a acurácia e o poder das previsões. Neste ponto será decido quais variáveis explicativas entrarão no modelo, e critério para a seleção pode seguir princípios fisiológicos ou o procedimento stepwise (Guisan e Zimmermann, 2000) Avaliação do modelo Métricas de avaliação Serão empregados o índice kappa, o ROC-plot e o bootstrap, pois estes métodos têm apresentado bons resultados mesmo no caso de pequenos conjuntos amostrais (Engler et al., 2004; Rushton et al., 2004). E caso o banco de dados seja suficientemente grande, para possibilitar sua divisão em dois conjuntos de dados independentes para uma mesma área, a avaliação através de um conjunto independente de dados será utilizada.

141 Análise da sensibilidade do modelo a qualidade dos dados de entrada Não foram encontrados na literatura trabalhos que relatem a sensibilidade dos modelos a diferentes níveis de qualidade do posicionamento de dados de entrada. Além disso, os dados dos trabalhos que comparam a perfomance de modelos não foram classificados quanto à precisão do posicionamento. Em primeiro lugar é necessária uma avaliação da qualidade e uma classificação dos dados de entrada. A princípio esta avaliação será realizada qualitativamente, de acordo com a sua origem. Por exemplo, coleta com sistema de posicionamento global (GPS) são teoricamente os dados com melhor posicionamento, mas que ainda assim possuem um erro associado que varia em alguns metros. Erros de usuário, como a escolha de uma projeção cartográfica inadequada (por exemplo, DATUM errado), podem levar a erros maiores. Após a etapa de classificação dos dados, será elaborado um desenho experimental para abarcar as diversas situações de erros de posicionamento para os todos os modelos a serem analisados. Os SDM serão calibrados com dados de diferentes qualidades para uma mesma área de estudo e para um mesmo conjunto de dados. Desse modo o resultado do mapa de saída e da performance dos modelos, e consequentemente a sensibilidade ao posicionamento, serão comparáveis. Na primeira análise serão utilizados os dados com a melhor qualidade de posicionamento, sendo seguido o organograma da FIGURA 3. Depois de obtidos os resultados do primeiro conjunto, retorna-se ao passo seguinte após a construção do banco e serão utilizadas amostras de outra categoria com erros de posicionamento maiores, repetindo os procedimentos de implementação. A cada experimento, uma situação de posicionamento distinta será gerada e sua saída do modelo será analisada. E caso não exista dados em alguma categoria, os erros de posicionamento referentes a esta classe serão simulados. REFERÊNCIAS BIBLIOGRÁFICAS Austin, M. P. Spatial prediction of species distributions: an interface between ecological theory and statistical modelling. Ecological Modelling, v. 157, p , Elith, J., Graham, C.H., and NCEAS Modeling Group (in press) Novel methods improve prediction of species? Distributions from occurrence data. Ecography. 64p Engler, R.; Guisan, A.; Rechsteiner, L. An improved approach for predicting the distribution of rare and endangered species from occurrence and pseudo-absence data. Journal of Applied Ecology, v. 41, p , Fielding, A. H.; Bell, J. F. A review of methods for the assessment of prediction errors

142 in conservation presence/absence models. Environmental Conservation, v. 24, n. 1, p ,1997. Guisan, A.; Thuiller, W. Predicting species distribution: offering more than simple habitat models. Ecology Letters, v. 8, n. 9, p , Guisan, A.; Zimmermann, N. E. Predictive habitat distribution models in ecology. Ecological Modelling, v. 135, p , Hirzel, A. H.; Hausser, J.; Chessel, D.; Perrin, N. Ecological-niche factor analysis: how to compute habitat suitability maps without absence data? Ecology, v. 83, p , Neter, J.; Kutner, M. N.; Nachtssheim, C. J.; Wasserman, W. Applied linear statistical models. Boston: WCB/McGraw-Hill, 4ª Ed. 1996, 791 p. Phillips, S. J.; Anderson, R. P.; Schapire, R. E. Maximum entropy modeling of species geographic distributions. Ecological Modelling, v. 190, n. 3-4, p , Rushton, S. P.; Ormerod, S. J.; Kerby, G. New paradigms for modelling species distributions? Journal of Applied Ecology, v. 41, n , Segurado, P.; Araújo, M. B. An evaluation of methods for modelling species distributions. Journal of Biogeography, v. 31, p , Siqueira, M. F. d. Uso de modelagem de nicho fundamental na avaliação do padrão de distribuição geográfica de espécies vegetais. 107 p. Tese de doutorado (Escola de Engenharia de São Carlos da Universidade de São Paulo), São Carlos, Zaniewski, A. E.; Lehmann, A.; Overton, J. M. Predicting species spatial distributions using presence-olny data: a case study of native New Zealand ferns. Ecological modelling, v. 157, p , 2002.

143 Annex 16 Distribuição Espacial, Modelagem da Diversidade e Riqueza Filogenética de Bignoniaceae na Amazônia Brasileira Cristina Bestetti Costa Resumo Esta proposta visa desenvolver um estudo da diversidade da Amazônia Legal utilizando os mais recentes resultados publicados sobre a família Bignoniaceae nesta região, bem como a integração destes dados com um Sistemas de Informação Geográfico e ferramentas de Modelagem de previsão de distribuição de espécies. Será utilizado o banco de dados de Bignoniaceae integrado a um conjunto de informações geográficas. Para obtenção dos modelos de distribuição, será utilizado o algoritmo GARP dentro do sistema OpenModeller. Os resultados permitirão ampliar o conhecimento da distribuição e diversidade das Bignoniaceae na Amazônia. Os dados de filogenia existentes para as Bignoniaceae neotropicais servirão de base para o cálculo de diversidade filogenética para a região Amazônica, permitindo indicar possíveis áreas prioritárias para conservação. Palavras-chave: Modelagem, Biogeografia, Bignoniaceae, Diversidade, Amazônia Introdução O entendimento de padrões de distribuição espacial das espécies é fundamental para a conservação da diversidade biológica. É possível observar um acelerado processo de declínio do número de espécies (Pimm et al. 1995) e populações (Hughes & Daily et al. 1997) em diferentes ecossistemas, devido principalmente ao impacto da ocupação humana.em virtude deste cenário, torna-se fundamental a compreensão dos fatores que determinam alta diversidade e do aprimoramento dos métodos utilizados no seu estudo. Os índices de diversidade são especialmente importantes como ferramentas nas propostas de conservação de áreas, especialmente em regiões tropicais (Walker & Faith 1994; Faith et al. 2004), assim como os índices originados de bases filogenéticas, uma vez que as decisões de conservar determinadas áreas muitas vezes estão baseadas em dados limitados disponíveis para as regiões tropicais (Faith 1992b; Ferrier 2002; Funk & Richardson 2002). Várias técnicas de modelagem de distribuição geográfica de espécies têm sido utilizadas na determinação de áreas prioritárias para conservação (p.e., Funk et al. 1999; Guisan & Zimmermann 2000; ter Steege et al. 2000). Tais técnicas são auxiliadas com o uso de ferramentas computacionais, como os Sistemas de Informação Geográfica (SIGs), que permitem armazenar e relacionar uma grande quantidade de dados, de diferentes origens e formatos. Dentro deste contexto, a utilização de táxons bem conhecidos (tanto sua taxonomia, quanto sua filogenia) nos estudos de diversidade representa uma importante alternativa nos estudos de biodiversidade nas regiões tropicais (Funk & Richardson 2002).

144 Análise de Biodiversidade e Riqueza Filogenética O desenvolvimento de metodologias para estudo e conservação da diversidade está diretamente ligado aos estudos biogeográficos (Prance 2000). A biogeografia num contexto de conservação trabalha descrevendo os padrões de distribuição de espécies, identificando áreas com riqueza de espécies e de endemismos, comparando a composição biológica de diferentes áreas e ainda a identificando as bases genéticas e evolutivas para manutenção da diversidade (Crisci et al. 2003). Podem ser resumidos três diferentes conceitos referentes à quantificação da diversidade: Riqueza de espécies, evenness e riqueza filogenética (para uma revisão ver Purvis & Hector 2000). Estes três principais conceitos podem ser aplicados não apenas ao nível de espécies e estudos de categorias taxonômicas superiores, como também para estudos de populações e diversidade genética (Moritz 2002). Muitos índices de diversidade buscam refletir não só um, mas mais de um destes conceitos em um número. Dentre os índices mais utilizados para cálculos e comparação de riqueza estão: índice de riqueza de espécies de Margalef (1958); índice de diversidade de Shannon (Shannon & Weaver 1949); índice de diversidade de Simpsons; Pielou s evenness (Pielou 1966); diversidade taxonômica de Warwick & Clarke (1995); diversidade filogenética de Vane-Wright at al. (1991) e Phylogenetic diversity (PD) (Faith 1992a). Estudos que tentam integrar dados de distribuição de espécies, modelagem de distribuição de espécies e hipóteses filogenéticas podem resultar em novidades no que diz respeito aos fatores que influenciam os padrões geográficos e evolutivos das espécies (Graham et al. 2004). Tal integração permite discutir questões ligadas aos fatores abióticos e de biogeografia histórica determinando a distribuição espacial das espécies; a influência das determinantes ambientais nas variações populacionais e genéticas; permite levantar alguns dos processos limitantes da distribuição que não aquelas ligadas ao nicho, como competição e dispersão (Graham et al. 2004). Anderson et al. (2002) estudaram modelagem de nicho ecológico de roedores e detectaram que a espécie Heteromys australis competia diretamente com a espécie-irmã H. anomalus quando em simpatria. Naquelas áreas onde H. australis estava ausente (provavelmente por razões históricas), a distribuição de H. anomalus estendia-se por todo limite determinado pelo modelo. As estimativas de diversidade filogenética buscam indicar aquelas áreas prioritárias para conservação baseadas nas informações filogenéticas dos táxons existentes em tais áreas. O principal é hierarquizar tais áreas considerando várias fatores como riqueza de táxons, padrões de distribuição, endemismos e complementaridade entre áreas (Posadas et al. 2001). Diversidade florística na Amazônia As angiospermas amazônicas são distribuídas entre aproximadamente 164 famílias (Prance 1978). Estimativas do número de espécies são divergentes. Gentry (1982) obteve uma estimativa de espécies amazônicas -- excluindo espécies acima de 500m de

145 altitude nas encostas dos Andes -- e considerando tanto os efeitos de novas descobertas, como das futuras revisões taxonômicas que detectariam sinônimos. Schultes & Raffauf (1990 apud Oliveira et al. 2002) consideravam este patamar muito conservador, apontando espécies como mais realista, embora não apresentaram uma metodologia para sua estimativa. Gentry (1997) reduziu sua própria estimativa para A existência de alta diversidade nas regiões tropicais sempre foi foco de estudos de muitos pesquisadores. Com base nas coleções de herbários, Williams et al. (1996) interpretaram as distribuições de 729 espécies de cinco famílias botânicas comuns na Amazônia e nos Andes, para inferir a localização de concentrações de diversidade e endemismo e apontar locais floristicamente complementares, prioritários para a conservação. Os resultados mostram uma alta diversidade em toda a região amazônica para este conjunto de espécies, com um pico na Amazônia Central. A grande diversidade da região de Manaus não é acompanhada por uma alta na diversidade de Belém, o que seria esperado se este resultado fosse derivado do artefato de coleta, já que Belém detém maior esforço de coleta do que Manaus (Nelson et al. 1993). Pitman et al. (2001), em levantamentos em parcelas localizadas em áreas de florestas de terra firme do Equador e Peru, relatam a existência de forte homogeneidade nestas áreas, onde algumas espécies pertencentes a apenas quatro famílias (Arecaceae, Moraceae, Myristicaceae e Violaceae) são dominantes em grandes extensões. Os resultados destes autores confirmam algumas das observações publicadas por ter Steege et al. (2000), os quais observaram que 140 famílias neotropicais incluem árvores, mas apenas 16 famílias constituem 80% das árvores inventariadas em parcelas padronizadas. A importância relativa destas 16 famílias entre diferentes parcelas inventariadas tem uma clara correlação com a geografia. Na Amazônia oriental e nas Guianas, são predominantes as árvores das famílias Leguminosae, Lecythidaceae e Chrysobalanaceae, seja em terra firme, seja em florestas inundadas. Na Amazônia ocidental e sul-ocidental, estas famílias tem menor importância, sendo mais abundantes as árvores de Arecaceae, Moraceae e Myristicaceae. O mesmo padrão geográfico é encontrado quando a importância das famílias é medida pelo seu número de espécies, dentro das parcelas. Ao nível de família, a composição florística aparenta variar ao longo de um gradiente cujo eixo segue na direção WSW-ENE, atravessando Amazônia, com uma zona de transição na Amazônia Central (Oliveira et al. 2002). Segundo Oliveira & Daly (1999), a alta diversidade de espécies arbóreas da Amazônia Central estaria relacionada a uma confluência de regiões fitogeográficas distintas, reunindo espécies provenientes de diferentes regiões. Examinado vários trabalhos disponíveis com levantamento em parcelas padronizadas contendo aproximadamente o mesmo número de indivíduos, Gentry (1988a, 1988b) descreveu um gradiente de diversidade de árvores que aumenta do leste para o oeste na Amazônia. O mesmo autor detectou uma relação entre a alta diversidade de parcelas e os climas mais chuvosos e menos sazonais, bem como solos relativamente mais ricos em nutrientes (Gentry 1988a). Entretanto, outros autores relacionam a

146 diversidade das parcelas em florestas neotropicais à taxa de turnover: florestas com altas taxas de mortalidade e recrutamento seriam mais ricas em espécies (Phillips et al. 1994). Contradizendo o argumento que a alta diversidade encontrada na Amazônia teria origem numa estabilidade durante longos períodos geológicos (e.g., Federov 1966; Richards 1969), evidências de grandes mudanças climáticas e na cobertura vegetal desta região tiveram lugar durante o Pleistoceno e o Holoceno mais recente foram apresentadas e defendidas por muitos autores (revisões em Prance 1982; Prance 1985). Durante tais períodos, o clima da Terra flutuou entre intervalos de clima secos e úmidos, glaciações e variações nos níveis dos oceanos, causando mudanças na cobertura vegetal que permaneceu intacta apenas em algumas áreas onde o clima permaneceu quente e úmido o suficiente para mantê-la. Evidências geológicas, palinológicas e padrões geográficos de especiação e diferenciação de organismos atuais confirmam a existência dos refúgios (Prance 1985; Pennington et al. 2004a). Apesar destas evidências, a teoria dos refúgios acumulou muitas críticas daqueles autores que defendiam padrões de especiação parapátricos ao invés de alopátricos nas extensas áreas das florestas tropicais (Endler 1977 apud Knapp & Mallet 2003) e daqueles que relacionaram os refúgios aos esforços de coleta nestas regiões (Nelson et al. 1993). Como a diversidade florística da floresta amazônica foi afetada pelos longos períodos de seca reportados para o Pleistoceno e quais as suas influências nos processos de especiação e extinção nos Neotropicos continua sendo um assunto polêmico mesmo após 30 anos da publicação da teoria dos refúgios (Haffer 1969). Muitos autores acreditam que a redução das chuvas na Amazônia levou a mudanças significativas na estrutura da vegetação e na composição das espécies (Haffer & Prance 2001; Pennington et al. 2004a). Porém, os oponentes desta idéia, rejeitam a existência de mudanças significativas na vegetação (Colinvoux et al. 2001). Em recentes publicações (van der Hammen & Hooghiemstra 2000), alguns autores acreditam que tais pontos não são conflitantes e que existem áreas na Amazônia que foram mais afetadas pelo clima frio e seco do Pleistoceno do que outras. Existem ainda fortes evidências de que mesmo mudanças aparentemente insignificantes de temperatura, pluviosidade e níveis de CO2 durante o Pleistoceno, teriam provocado forte impacto na estrutura do dossel (Cowling et al. 2001) e na composição florística de epífitas (Kreft et al. 2004). Apesar do desenvolvimento de algoritmos e softwares que auxiliam os estudos que buscam entender os padrões de distribuição da diversidade nas regiões tropicais, estas ferramentas requerem inicialmente a existência de informações sobre a distribuição espacial dos organismos (Graham et al. 2004). A existência de tais dados passou a ser hoje um pré-requisito para qualquer tentativa de mapear padrões de distribuição e diversidade. Mesmo áreas onde há projetos sistemáticos de estudos de biodiversidade, estão longe de possuírem dados completos e detalhados dos diversos níveis de interesse (genes, populações, espécies, comunidades, ecossistemas), muito menos organizados em bancos de dados acessíveis (Graham et al. 2004). A solução provisória para este problema é tentar utilizar grupos de organismos dos quais as informações de distribuição espacial estejam disponíveis, estendendo os resultados para padrões de biodiversidade

147 como um todo (Funk et al. 1999; ter Steege et al. 2000; Ferrier 2002; Funk & Richardson 2002). Infelizmente, a região da Amazônia brasileira possui enorme carência de recursos humanos e estruturais que impede o amplo conhecimento da sua flora. A necessidade de estudos taxonômicos, especialmente nas regiões tropicais, tem sido expressa de forma eloqüente em inúmeras publicações e é sem dúvida a base para os estudos de biodiversidade ( Without taxonomy to give shape to the bricks and systematists to tell us how to put them together, the house of biological science is a meaningless jumble., May 1990). Com o objetivo de obter padrões de diversidade na região amazônica, busca-se selecionar grupos de plantas vasculares cujo conhecimento sistemático já esteja em estágio avançado. Outros critérios de escolha de grupos a serem estudados são: I. A existência de especialista para consulta; II. Que aspectos nomenclaturais tenham sido recentemente revistos, minimizando possíveis erros taxonômicos; III. A existência de dados de ocorrência organizados e georreferenciados. No entanto, a seleção de grupos taxonômicos como foco de estudos de padrões de diversidade apresenta dois principais problemas: a incongruência entre a distribuição exibida pelo grupo em questão versus a distribuição da biodiversidade como um todo. Como também, as coleções existentes não refletem a verdadeira distribuição do grupo, uma vez que as coletas estão restritas as áreas de fácil acesso, resultando em falsasausências (Ferrier 2002). Além do uso de algoritmos na modelagem de distribuição espacial de espécies (p.e., GARP - Stockwell & Noble 1992), é possível a utilização de diferentes abordagens estatísticas (Guisan & Zimmermann 2000). Uma variedade de modelos estatísticos tem sido utilizada para simular a distribuição espacial de plantas vasculares terrestres, como também, minimizar os efeitos dos gaps existentes (Carpenter et al. 1993; Guisan & Zimmermann 2000). Dentre as diversas técnicas e algoritmos existentes, o modelo DOMAIN (Carpenter et al. 1993) e Estatística Bayesiana (BAYES formula Aspinall 1992) têm sido aplicados naqueles casos onde os dados disponíveis são limitados e apresentam resultados positivos na correção de falsas-ausências (Skidmore 1989; Fischer 1990; Aspinall 1992). A família Bignoniaceae As Bignoniaceae compreendem 104 gêneros e ca. 860 espécies distribuídas em regiões tropicais e subtropicais, com raros representantes em regiões temperadas. A maioria dos seus representantes encontra-se na região dos Neotrópicos, com ca. 80 gêneros e 600 espécies (Lohmann 2004; Fischer et al. 2004). Dentre as oito tribos referidas para a família (Tecomeae, Oroxyleae, Bignonieae, Eccremocarpeae, Tourretieae, Coleeae, Crescentieae e Schlegelieae), as tribos Bignonieae, Eccremocarpeae, Tourretieae e Crescentieae são os grupos predominantes na região dos Neotrópicos (Fischer et al. 2004).A tribo Tecomeae possui representantes em toda região tropical, sendo que a maioria das Bignoniaceae da África e Ásia pertence a este grupo; porém a maior diversidade encontrase nos Neotrópicos (Fischer et al. 2004).

148 Na região amazônica a família Bignoniaceae é referida entre as mais importantes e diversas (Gentry 1982b; Lohmann & Hopkins 1999). As Bignoniaceae figuram entre as principais famílias de árvores e lianas que contribuem com a riqueza encontrada nos Neotrópicos (Gentry 1988a). Semelhante a este resultado, para inventários em parcelas de 0,1ha em florestas secas de planície, as Bignoniaceae são a segunda família em número de espécies (depois de Leguminosae) e, nestas áreas, são, predominantemente, lianas (Gentry 1988a). Também na África e Ásia, as Bignoniaceae encontram-se entre as quinze famílias mais representativas das florestas tropicais de planície (Gentry 1988b). O número de espécies e gêneros da família é alto naquelas florestas tropicais com fortes estações secas e sofre decréscimo nas regiões de elevada altitude (p.e., nos Andes) e nas zonas temperadas (Gentry 1988; Lohmann 2004; Fischer et al. 2004). Tendo como base Lohmann (2003) e o banco de dados resultante deste trabalho, serão selecionadas algumas espécies de Bignoniaceae (tribo Bignonieae), de ocorrência na região da Amazônia Legal, para estudos de distribuição espacial e modelagem. Distribuição Espacial e Modelagem As relações entre a ocorrência de espécies e os fatores ambientais são geralmente baseadas em modelos estatísticos. A causa da relação não é estabelecida, mas uma relação funcional pode ser encontrada. Segundo alguns autores (Austin & Meyers 1996, Guisan & Zimmermann 2000), a estrutura dos estudos de modelagem engloba três principais componentes: o modelo ecológico utilizado ou a ser testado; o modelo de dados, i.é., coleta, medida e estimativa dos dados utilizados; e finalmente o modelo estatístico, que engloba os métodos estatísticos empregados. A quantificação da relação espécie-ambiente representa o centro da modelagem preditiva geográfica em ecologia e está baseada na hipótese de fatores ambientais controlando a distribuição de espécies e comunidades, em função de desempenho fisiológico e limitação do ecossistema (Austin et al. 1990). O conceito de nicho fundamental no contexto de modelagem preditiva foi recentemente revisado por diversos autores (e.g. Austin et al. 1990; Westman 1991; Leibold 1995; Franklin 1995; Guisan & Zimmermann 2000). Franklin (1995) define mapeamento preditivo de vegetação como o prognóstico da distribuição da composição florística da vegetação em uma paisagem, a partir da distribuição de variáveis ambientais mapeadas que condicionam sua ocorrência. Para gerar a espacialização da informação, o mapeamento preditivo inicia-se com o desenvolvimento do modelo e é seguido pela aplicação deste modelo num banco de dados geográficos com o objetivo de produzir o mapa preditivo (Franklin 1995) ou mapa de distribuição de espécies (MDE). No mapeamento preditivo a variável dependente pode ser contínua (abundância) ou categórica (presença/ausência de espécies, fitofisionomia); assim como a variável independente pode ser contínua (pluviosidade, temperatura, elevação, etc.) ou categórica

149 (tipo de solo, geomorfologia, etc.). A modelagem preditiva derivada da utilização de diversas técnicas estatísticas permite a relação entre tais variáveis e pode permitir ainda a quantificação de incertezas e correções de erros inerentes ao processo analítico de mapeamento (Franklin 1995; Guisan & Zimmermann 2000). Dado o contexto em que se insere a modelagem preditiva e a capacidade dos Sistemas de Informação Geográfica (SIG) de armazenar e relacionar dados de diferentes origens e formatos, torna-se evidente a adequação do uso destas ferramentas na elaboração de mapeamentos da distribuição potencial de espécies vegetais (Graham et al. 2004) e geração de mapas de diversidade (SDMs - Species Distribution Models) (Guisan & Thuiller 2005). Técnicas de Geoprocessamento e de Sensoriamento Remoto podem ser aplicadas na busca deste entendimento pois permitem a integração e análise de dados de diversas fontes e com diversos formatos. Justificativa As informações originárias de coleções biológicas e estudos taxonômicos têm sido disponibilizados em várias redes de informações e utilizadas com sucesso nos estudos de biodiversidade. Quando integradas aos dados espaciais e ambientais, as informações das coleções biológicas podem ser aplicadas em diferentes abordagens, desde discussões ecológicas e evolutivas, até aplicações mais práticas, como conservação. Através da integração de diferentes disciplinas e utilizando e aprimorando ferramentas de modelagem, este trabalho busca ampliar o conhecimento da distribuição e diversidade vegetal da Amazônia Brasileira e entender os padrões biogeográficos e evolutivos de grupos de Bignoniaceae. Estudos desta natureza são importantes instrumentos em planos de conservação e no planejamento do uso da terra. Além disso, o trabalho proposto busca promover a integração entre diversos pesquisadores de diferentes instituições e o compartilhamento de dados e informações. Objetivos O objetivo maior desta proposta é a integração entre informações e ferramentas para discussão de biodiversidade da região amazônica. As Bignoniaceae serão utilizadas, não só pela disponibilidade de dados, mas pela importância na composição florística da região e nos neotrópicos como um todo. Ao final do trabalho será possível discutir os padrões de distribuição encontrados para as Bignoniaceae à luz das teorias de biogeografia e padrões de diversidade da região amazônica. Além disso, os resultados de riqueza filogenética permitirão discutir a questão da conservação a partir dos padrões de distribuição geográfica dos táxons e no relacionamento entre eles, baseado numa classificação cladística. A combinação de um estudo filogenético e informações geográficas pode representar um importante passo na inclusão de informações históricas na conservação da diversidade da região amazônica. A partir disto, este trabalho visa: Objetivos Gerais - contribuir para o conhecimento da família Bignoniaceae na região amazônica e nos

150 Neotrópicos; - contribuir com o desenvolvimento de um estudo de caso como parte da Rede Temática de Pesquisa em Modelagem Ambiental da Amazônia-GEOMA; - contribuir com o desenvolvimento do sistema Open Modeller/Fapesp; - testar modelos matemáticos para previsão de distribuíção geográfica de espécies, usando como entrada os dados obtidos nas bases descritas nos itens anteriores. Objetivos Específicos - buscar e organizar as informações sobre tais espécies existentes nos principais herbários nacionais e bibliografia e estruturá-las nos sistemas SPRING e TerraView e integrar com a base inicial de dados existente da Rede GEOMA, compreendendo dados climáticos e do ambiente físico para a Amazônia Legal; - identificar os layers mais relevantes (vegetação, precipitação, umidade, temperatura, solo e geologia) para utilização nos testes de distribuição espacial e modelagem de espécies da Amazônia Legal; - gerar modelos de distribuição das espécies selecionadas utilizando os algoritmos GARP, distância mínima, distância à média e distância bioclimática; - testar a aplicação dos dados e os modelos de distribuição geográfica de espécies e produzir mapas de distribuição de espécies (MDE); - mapear padrões de riqueza de espécies e riqueza filogenética da família Bignoniaceae na Amazônia utilizando os índices de Vane-Wright et al. (1991); - identificar resolução espacial na qual são distintos os padrões de riqueza filogenética da família Bignoniaceae; - mapear tendências geográficas de diversidade da família Bignoniaceae e possíveis áreas de maior riqueza e diversidade. Material e Método Banco de Dados das Informações Sobre Diversidade das Espécies de Bignoniaceae da Amazônia O uso de dados de coleções de herbário nos estudos de biodiversidade sempre sofreu críticas por apresentar limitações como representação geográfica parcial, uma vez que as coletas normalmente ocorrem em locais de fácil acesso, e falsas informações de riqueza taxonômica, já que grupos de fácil reconhecimento, identificação e/ou coleta são

151 privilegiados (Nelson et al. 1993; ter Steege & Persaud 1991; Oliveira et al. 2002). Apesar disto, dados originários de coleções de herbário têm sido utilizados com êxito na confecção de mapas de riqueza e no levantamento de áreas prioritárias para conservação, juntamente com dados abióticos (Funk et al. 1999; ter Steege et al. 2000; Funk et al. 2002), uma vez que são registros acessíveis, permanentes e passíveis de verificação e correção por especialistas. Outros autores tem discutido e registrado a importância e os benefícios da utilização de dados de herbários e museus como base de estudos de biodiversidade, p.e., Goodman & Lanyon 1994; Cotterill 1995, Graham et al Como já discutido acima, as lacunas existentes pelo uso de coleções podem ser minimizadas no momento da formulação do modelo e da escolha da análise estatística a ser empregada (Guisan & Zimmermann 2000). Modelos baseados em envelopes climáticos como o DOMAIN (Carpenter et al. 1993) e em Estatística Bayesiana (BAYES formula Aspinall 1992) são exemplos de análises que buscam minimizar a influência do esforço de coletas sobre os resultados (Guisan & Zimmermann 2000). Serão utilizados os dados de grupos de Bignoniaceae disponibilizados pela Profª. Lúcia Lohman, do Departamento de Botânica do Instituto de Biociências da USP, São Paulo. As informações contidas neste banco estão organizadas em planilhas de Microsoft Exel e foram obtidas de coleções dos principais herbários nacionais e estrangeiros (Lohman 2003). Base de Dados das Variáveis Ambientais A área de estudo será a região da Amazônia Legal Brasileira. Para a modelagem de distribuição de espécies, além de dados sobre a ocorrência das espécies, um conjunto de informações geográficas é fundamental para caracterizar o ambiente, definindo o nicho potencial dos táxons em questão. Os dados climatológicos, como precipitação, umidade, temperatura, de caracterização do terreno, como altimetria, declividade, solo e geologia, e de tipologia vegetal, serão representados em Sistema de Informação Geográfica, na resolução espacial compatível com a escala de análise da Amazônia Legal Brasileira. A relação inicial das variáveis ambientais encontra-se detalhada na Tabela 1. Este conjunto de variáveis iniciais poderá ser acrescido de novas variáveis, conforme o táxon a ser trabalhado. A esta base de dados serão acrescentadas as informações planimétricas, tais como drenagem, limites urbanos, e rede viária, e os dados de ocorrência das espécies amazônicas serão importados do banco de dados relacional de Bignoniáceas. O sistema TerraView (http://www.dpi.inpe.br/terraview/index.php) possibilitará a estruturação da base de dados em um banco TerraLib. Para obter os modelos de distribuição das espécies, o sistema OpenModeller (http://openmodeller.sourceforge.net/) será utilizado.

152 Tabela 1 Variáveis ambientais para elaboração dos modelos de distribuição das espécies O OpenModeller oferece um ambiente computacional para modelagem de distribuição de espécies a partir da identificação do nicho fundamental. Atualmente, o OpenModeller disponibiliza os algoritmos de Distância Bioclimática, Modelo Espaço- Climático, Distância à Média, Distância Mínima e o algoritmo genético para predição de regras GARP (Genetic Algorithm for Rule-Set Prediction). O desenvolvimento e aplicação do conjunto de dados ambientais e integração com a modelagem contará com o suporte de pesquisadores da Divisão de Processamento de Imagens (DPI) do Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE). Modelagem de Distribuição de Espécies na Amazônia Para modelagem de distribuição de espécies, será utilizado o algoritmo genético GARP (Genetic Algorithm for Rule-Set Prediction) (Stockwell & Noble 1992). Este algoritmo permite previsões da distribuição geográfica de uma dada espécie a partir de modelos de nicho fundamental de espécies e com base nos dados de seus pontos de ocorrência, fornecidos pelo banco de dados, e de um conjunto de coberturas geográficas

Métodos Formais em Engenharia de Software. VDMToolTutorial

Métodos Formais em Engenharia de Software. VDMToolTutorial Métodos Formais em Engenharia de Software VDMToolTutorial Ana Paiva apaiva@fe.up.pt www.fe.up.pt/~apaiva Agenda Install Start Create a project Write a specification Add a file to a project Check syntax

Leia mais

User interface evaluation experiences: A brief comparison between usability and communicability testing

User interface evaluation experiences: A brief comparison between usability and communicability testing User interface evaluation experiences: A brief comparison between usability and communicability testing Kern, Bryan; B.S.; The State University of New York at Oswego kern@oswego.edu Tavares, Tatiana; PhD;

Leia mais

Easy Linux! FUNAMBOL FOR IPBRICK MANUAL. IPortalMais: a «brainware» company www.iportalmais.pt. Manual

Easy Linux! FUNAMBOL FOR IPBRICK MANUAL. IPortalMais: a «brainware» company www.iportalmais.pt. Manual IPortalMais: a «brainware» company FUNAMBOL FOR IPBRICK MANUAL Easy Linux! Title: Subject: Client: Reference: Funambol Client for Mozilla Thunderbird Doc.: Jose Lopes Author: N/Ref.: Date: 2009-04-17 Rev.:

Leia mais

Serviços: API REST. URL - Recurso

Serviços: API REST. URL - Recurso Serviços: API REST URL - Recurso URLs reflectem recursos Cada entidade principal deve corresponder a um recurso Cada recurso deve ter um único URL Os URLs referem em geral substantivos URLs podem reflectir

Leia mais

Digital Cartographic Generalization for Database of Cadastral Maps

Digital Cartographic Generalization for Database of Cadastral Maps Mariane Alves Dal Santo marianedalsanto@udesc.br Francisco Henrique de Oliveira chicoliver@yahoo.com.br Carlos Loch cloch@ecv.ufsc.br Laboratório de Geoprocessamento GeoLab Universidade do Estado de Santa

Leia mais

Tese / Thesis Work Análise de desempenho de sistemas distribuídos de grande porte na plataforma Java

Tese / Thesis Work Análise de desempenho de sistemas distribuídos de grande porte na plataforma Java Licenciatura em Engenharia Informática Degree in Computer Science Engineering Análise de desempenho de sistemas distribuídos de grande porte na plataforma Java Performance analysis of large distributed

Leia mais

Easy Linux! FUNAMBOL FOR IPBRICK MANUAL. IPortalMais: a «brainmoziware» company www.iportalmais.pt. Manual Jose Lopes

Easy Linux! FUNAMBOL FOR IPBRICK MANUAL. IPortalMais: a «brainmoziware» company www.iportalmais.pt. Manual Jose Lopes IPortalMais: a «brainmoziware» company www.iportalmais.pt FUNAMBOL FOR IPBRICK MANUAL Easy Linux! Title: Subject: Client: Reference: Funambol Client for Microsoft Outlook Doc.: Author: N/Ref.: Date: 2009-04-17

Leia mais

Interoperability through Web Services: Evaluating OGC Standards in Client Development for Spatial Data Infrastructures

Interoperability through Web Services: Evaluating OGC Standards in Client Development for Spatial Data Infrastructures GeoInfo - 2006 Interoperability through Web Services: Evaluating OGC Standards in Client Development for Spatial Data Infrastructures Leonardo Lacerda Alves Clodoveu A. Davis Jr. Information Systems Lab

Leia mais

Information technology specialist (systems integration) Especialista em tecnologia da informação (integração de sistemas)

Information technology specialist (systems integration) Especialista em tecnologia da informação (integração de sistemas) Information technology specialist (systems integration) Especialista em tecnologia da informação (integração de sistemas) Professional activities/tasks Design and produce complex ICT systems by integrating

Leia mais

MTM00008 - MANUAL DE INSTALAÇÃO DE ADEMPIERE NO LINUX DEBIAN

MTM00008 - MANUAL DE INSTALAÇÃO DE ADEMPIERE NO LINUX DEBIAN Processo de instalação: 1-Adicionar ao arquivo /etc/apt/sources.list os pacotes não livres: deb http://http.us.debian.org/debian/ etch main contrib non-free ou algum outro de sua escolha. 2-Instalar o

Leia mais

Guião M. Descrição das actividades

Guião M. Descrição das actividades Proposta de Guião para uma Prova Grupo: Inovação Disciplina: Inglês, Nível de Continuação, 11.º ano Domínio de Referência: O Mundo do trabalho Duração da prova: 15 a 20 minutos 1.º MOMENTO Guião M Intervenientes

Leia mais

NORMAS PARA AUTORES. As normas a seguir descritas não dispensam a leitura do Regulamento da Revista Portuguesa de Marketing, disponível em www.rpm.pt.

NORMAS PARA AUTORES. As normas a seguir descritas não dispensam a leitura do Regulamento da Revista Portuguesa de Marketing, disponível em www.rpm.pt. NORMAS PARA AUTORES As normas a seguir descritas não dispensam a leitura do Regulamento da Revista Portuguesa de Marketing, disponível em www.rpm.pt. COPYRIGHT Um artigo submetido à Revista Portuguesa

Leia mais

USPTO No. 15143095 USPTO No. 15143095 USPTO No. 15143095 USPTO No. 15143095 USPTO No. 15143095 USPTO No. 15143095 USPTO No. 15143095 WORK PLAN FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF THE UNITED STATES PATENT AND

Leia mais

A Cloud Computing Architecture for Large Scale Video Data Processing

A Cloud Computing Architecture for Large Scale Video Data Processing Marcello de Lima Azambuja A Cloud Computing Architecture for Large Scale Video Data Processing Dissertação de Mestrado Dissertation presented to the Postgraduate Program in Informatics of the Departamento

Leia mais

UNIVERSIDADE DE SÃO PAULO FACULDADE DE EDUCAÇÃO JOÃO FÁBIO PORTO. Diálogo e interatividade em videoaulas de matemática

UNIVERSIDADE DE SÃO PAULO FACULDADE DE EDUCAÇÃO JOÃO FÁBIO PORTO. Diálogo e interatividade em videoaulas de matemática UNIVERSIDADE DE SÃO PAULO FACULDADE DE EDUCAÇÃO JOÃO FÁBIO PORTO Diálogo e interatividade em videoaulas de matemática São Paulo 2010 JOÃO FÁBIO PORTO Diálogo e interatividade em videoaulas de matemática

Leia mais

Cluster com MPICH2 no UBUNTU

Cluster com MPICH2 no UBUNTU Cluster com MPICH2 no UBUNTU NOV/2010 Este documento é apenas um resumo, caso seja necessário, ver com mais detalhes os arquivos: mpich2-doc-user.pdf e mpich2-doc-install.pdf. Estes docs vem junto com

Leia mais

Efficient Locally Trackable Deduplication in Replicated Systems. www.gsd.inesc-id.pt. technology from seed

Efficient Locally Trackable Deduplication in Replicated Systems. www.gsd.inesc-id.pt. technology from seed Efficient Locally Trackable Deduplication in Replicated Systems João Barreto and Paulo Ferreira Distributed Systems Group INESC-ID/Technical University Lisbon, Portugal www.gsd.inesc-id.pt Bandwidth remains

Leia mais

Curso CP100A - Google Cloud Platform Fundamentals (8h)

Curso CP100A - Google Cloud Platform Fundamentals (8h) Curso CP100A - Google Cloud Platform Fundamentals (8h) Este curso virtual liderado por um instrutor, com 8 horas de duração, introduz os participantes aos produtos e serviços do Google Cloud Platform.

Leia mais

Project Management Activities

Project Management Activities Id Name Duração Início Término Predecessoras 1 Project Management Activities 36 dias Sex 05/10/12 Sex 23/11/12 2 Plan the Project 36 dias Sex 05/10/12 Sex 23/11/12 3 Define the work 15 dias Sex 05/10/12

Leia mais

Get Involved with Fedora QA

Get Involved with Fedora QA Get Involved with Fedora QA Testing Presented by Fábio Olivé Based on a presentation by Wolnei Tomazelli Jr Creative Commons Topics What is testing all about? Benefits for you and Fedora What gets tested

Leia mais

GUIÃO Domínio de Referência: CIDADANIA E MULTICULTURALISMO

GUIÃO Domínio de Referência: CIDADANIA E MULTICULTURALISMO PROJECTO PROVAS EXPERIMENTAIS DE EXPRESSÃO ORAL DE LÍNGUA ESTRANGEIRA - 2005-2006 Ensino Secundário - Inglês, 12º ano - Nível de Continuação 1 1º Momento GUIÃO Domínio de Referência: CIDADANIA E MULTICULTURALISMO

Leia mais

GUIÃO A. Ano: 9º Domínio de Referência: O Mundo do Trabalho. 1º Momento. Intervenientes e Tempos. Descrição das actividades

GUIÃO A. Ano: 9º Domínio de Referência: O Mundo do Trabalho. 1º Momento. Intervenientes e Tempos. Descrição das actividades Ano: 9º Domínio de Referência: O Mundo do Trabalho GUIÃO A 1º Momento Intervenientes e Tempos Descrição das actividades Good morning / afternoon / evening, A and B. For about three minutes, I would like

Leia mais

SATA 3.5. hd:basic. hdd enclosure caixa externa para disco rígido

SATA 3.5. hd:basic. hdd enclosure caixa externa para disco rígido SATA 3.5 hd:basic hdd enclosure caixa externa para disco rígido hd:basic USER S GUIDE SPECIFICATIONS HDD support: SATA 3.5 Material: Aluminium Input connections: SATA HDD Output connections: USB 2.0

Leia mais

Versão: 1.0. Segue abaixo, os passos para o processo de publicação de artigos que envolvem as etapas de Usuário/Autor. Figura 1 Creating new user.

Versão: 1.0. Segue abaixo, os passos para o processo de publicação de artigos que envolvem as etapas de Usuário/Autor. Figura 1 Creating new user. Órgão: Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation Documento: Flow and interaction between users of the system for submitting files to the periodicals RJO - Brazilian Journal of Ornithology Responsável:

Leia mais

hdd enclosure caixa externa para disco rígido

hdd enclosure caixa externa para disco rígido hdd enclosure caixa externa para disco rígido USER S GUIDE SPECIFICATONS HDD Support: SATA 2.5 Material: Aluminium and plastics Input connections: SATA HDD Output connections: USB 3.0 (up to 5.0Gbps)

Leia mais

UNIDADE DE PESQUISA CLÍNICA Centro de Medicina Reprodutiva Dr Carlos Isaia Filho Ltda. SAMPLE SIZE DETERMINATION FOR CLINICAL RESEARCH

UNIDADE DE PESQUISA CLÍNICA Centro de Medicina Reprodutiva Dr Carlos Isaia Filho Ltda. SAMPLE SIZE DETERMINATION FOR CLINICAL RESEARCH SAMPLE SIZE DETERMINATION FOR CLINICAL RESEARCH Duolao Wang; Ameet Bakhai; Angelo Del Buono; Nicola Maffulli Muscle, Tendons and Ligaments Journal, 2013 Santiago A. Tobar L., Dsc. Why to determine the

Leia mais

Banca examinadora: Professor Paulo N. Figueiredo, Professora Fátima Bayma de Oliveira e Professor Joaquim Rubens Fontes Filho

Banca examinadora: Professor Paulo N. Figueiredo, Professora Fátima Bayma de Oliveira e Professor Joaquim Rubens Fontes Filho Título: Direção e Taxa (Velocidade) de Acumulação de Capacidades Tecnológicas: Evidências de uma Pequena Amostra de Empresas de Software no Rio de Janeiro, 2004 Autor(a): Eduardo Coelho da Paz Miranda

Leia mais

Select a single or a group of files in Windows File Explorer, right-click and select Panther Print

Select a single or a group of files in Windows File Explorer, right-click and select Panther Print Quick Start Guide SDI Panther Print Panther Print SDI Panther products make sharing information easier. Panther Print is an intuitive dialog box that provides a thumbnail view of the file to print, depicting

Leia mais

Participatory Map of Rio de Janeiro

Participatory Map of Rio de Janeiro Leandro Gomes Souza Geographer Luiz Roberto Arueira da Silva Director of City Information Pereira Passos Institute - City of Rio de Janeiro About us Pereira Passos Institute (IPP) is Rio de Janeiro municipal

Leia mais

T Ã O B O M Q U A N T O N O V O

T Ã O B O M Q U A N T O N O V O D I S S E R T A Ç Ã O D E M E S T R A D O M A S T E R I N G D I S S E R T A T I O N A V A L I A Ç Ã O D A C O N D I Ç Ã O D E T Ã O B O M Q U A N T O N O V O U M A A P L I C A Ç Ã O E N V O L V E N D O

Leia mais

Analysis, development and monitoring of business processes in Corporate environment

Analysis, development and monitoring of business processes in Corporate environment Analysis, development and monitoring of business processes in Corporate environment SAFIRA is an IT consulting boutique known for transforming the way organizations do business, or fulfil their missions,

Leia mais

Institutional Skills. Sessão informativa INSTITUTIONAL SKILLS. Passo a passo. www.britishcouncil.org.br

Institutional Skills. Sessão informativa INSTITUTIONAL SKILLS. Passo a passo. www.britishcouncil.org.br Institutional Skills Sessão informativa INSTITUTIONAL SKILLS Passo a passo 2 2 British Council e Newton Fund O British Council é a organização internacional do Reino Unido para relações culturais e oportunidades

Leia mais

User Guide Manual de Utilizador

User Guide Manual de Utilizador 2400 DPI OPTICAL GAMING MOUSE User Guide Manual de Utilizador 2014 1Life Simplify it All rights reserved. www.1-life.eu 2 2400 DPI OPTICAL GAMING MOUSE ENGLISH USER GUIDE...4 MANUAL DE UTILIZADOR PORTUGUÊS...18

Leia mais

Wiki::Score A Collaborative Environment For Music Transcription And Publishing

Wiki::Score A Collaborative Environment For Music Transcription And Publishing Wiki::Score A Collaborative Environment For Music Transcription And Publishing J.J. Almeida 1 N.R. Carvalho 1 J.N. Oliveira 1 1 Department of Informatics, University of Minho {jj,narcarvalho,jno}@di.uminho.pt

Leia mais

Guião A. Descrição das actividades

Guião A. Descrição das actividades Proposta de Guião para uma Prova Grupo: Ponto de Encontro Disciplina: Inglês, Nível de Continuação, 11.º ano Domínio de Referência: Um Mundo de Muitas Culturas Duração da prova: 15 a 20 minutos 1.º MOMENTO

Leia mais

Welcome to Lesson A of Story Time for Portuguese

Welcome to Lesson A of Story Time for Portuguese Portuguese Lesson A Welcome to Lesson A of Story Time for Portuguese Story Time is a program designed for students who have already taken high school or college courses or students who have completed other

Leia mais

Geração automática de suíte de teste para GUI a partir de Rede de Petri

Geração automática de suíte de teste para GUI a partir de Rede de Petri Raquel Jauffret Guilhon Geração automática de suíte de teste para GUI a partir de Rede de Petri Dissertação de Mestrado Dissertação apresentada como requisito parcial para obtenção do grau de Mestre pelo

Leia mais

Online Collaborative Learning Design

Online Collaborative Learning Design "Online Collaborative Learning Design" Course to be offered by Charlotte N. Lani Gunawardena, Ph.D. Regents Professor University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA July 7- August 14, 2014 Course

Leia mais

Software product lines. Paulo Borba Informatics Center Federal University of Pernambuco

Software product lines. Paulo Borba Informatics Center Federal University of Pernambuco Software product lines Paulo Borba Informatics Center Federal University of Pernambuco Software product lines basic concepts Paulo Borba Informatics Center Federal University of Pernambuco Um produto www.usm.maine.edu

Leia mais

Interactive Internet TV Architecture Based on Scalable Video Coding

Interactive Internet TV Architecture Based on Scalable Video Coding Interactive Internet TV Architecture Based on Scalable Video Coding Pedro Gomes Moscoso Dissertação para obtenção do Grau de Mestre em Engenharia de Redes de Comunicações Presidente: Orientador: Co-Orientador:

Leia mais

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO MANAGE YOUR PROJECTS

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO MANAGE YOUR PROJECTS EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO MANAGE YOUR PROJECTS elo Engineering Logistics Software Copyright - All rights reserved - DC2 Solutions Developed by A solução ELO foi desenhada para gerenciar todas as atividades

Leia mais

Searching for Employees Precisa-se de Empregados

Searching for Employees Precisa-se de Empregados ALIENS BAR 1 Searching for Employees Precisa-se de Empregados We need someone who can prepare drinks and cocktails for Aliens travelling from all the places in our Gallaxy. Necessitamos de alguém que possa

Leia mais

Aqui pode escolher o Sistema operativo, e o software. Para falar, faça download do Cliente 2.

Aqui pode escolher o Sistema operativo, e o software. Para falar, faça download do Cliente 2. TeamSpeak PORTUGUES ENGLISH Tutorial de registo num servidor de TeamSpeak Registration tutorial for a TeamSpeak server Feito por [WB ].::B*A*C*O::. membro de [WB ] War*Brothers - Non Dvcor Dvco Made by:

Leia mais

Addition of Fields in Line Item Display Report Output for TCode FBL1N/FBL5N

Addition of Fields in Line Item Display Report Output for TCode FBL1N/FBL5N Addition of Fields in Line Item Display Report Output for TCode FBL1N/FBL5N Applies to: Any business user who uses the transactions FBL1N and FBL5N to display line item reports for vendors and customers.

Leia mais

design para a inovação social

design para a inovação social design para a inovação social mestrado em design - 15 16 universidade de aveiro gonçalo gomes março de 2016 s.1 ergonomia ergonomia > definição Ergonomia A ergonomia (do grego "ergon": trabalho; e "nomos":

Leia mais

Software reliability analysis by considering fault dependency and debugging time lag Autores

Software reliability analysis by considering fault dependency and debugging time lag Autores Campos extraídos diretamente Título Software reliability analysis by considering fault dependency and debugging time lag Autores Huang, Chin-Yu and Lin, Chu-Ti Ano de publicação 2006 Fonte de publicação

Leia mais

manualdepsiquiatriainfant il manual de psiquiatria infantil

manualdepsiquiatriainfant il manual de psiquiatria infantil manualdepsiquiatriainfant il manual de psiquiatria infantil These guides possess a lot information especially advanced tips such as the optimum settings configuration for manualdepsiquiatriainfantil manual

Leia mais

Descrição das actividades

Descrição das actividades Proposta de Guião para uma Prova Grupo: Em Acção Disciplina: Inglês, Nível de Continuação, 11.º ano Domínio de Referência: O Mundo do Trabalho Duração da prova: 15 a 20 minutos Guião D 1.º MOMENTO Intervenientes

Leia mais

ACFES MAIORES DE 23 ANOS INGLÊS. Prova-modelo. Instruções. Verifique se o exemplar da prova está completo, isto é, se termina com a palavra FIM.

ACFES MAIORES DE 23 ANOS INGLÊS. Prova-modelo. Instruções. Verifique se o exemplar da prova está completo, isto é, se termina com a palavra FIM. ACFES MAIORES DE 23 ANOS INGLÊS Prova-modelo Instruções Verifique se o exemplar da prova está completo, isto é, se termina com a palavra FIM. A prova é avaliada em 20 valores (200 pontos). A prova é composta

Leia mais

Accessing the contents of the Moodle Acessando o conteúdo do Moodle

Accessing the contents of the Moodle Acessando o conteúdo do Moodle Accessing the contents of the Moodle Acessando o conteúdo do Moodle So that all the available files in the Moodle can be opened without problems, we recommend some software that will have to be installed

Leia mais

BRIGHAM AND EHRHARDT PDF

BRIGHAM AND EHRHARDT PDF BRIGHAM AND EHRHARDT PDF ==> Download: BRIGHAM AND EHRHARDT PDF BRIGHAM AND EHRHARDT PDF - Are you searching for Brigham And Ehrhardt Books? Now, you will be happy that at this time Brigham And Ehrhardt

Leia mais

INSTALANDO O LAM-MPI NO DEBIAN

INSTALANDO O LAM-MPI NO DEBIAN INSTALANDO O LAM-MPI NO DEBIAN Brivaldo Junior 25 de Março de 2006 1 Introdução A comunicação de processos por troca de mensagens é muito utilizada em programação paralela, especialmente em máquinas parelelas

Leia mais

2005 2011 O caminho da GMB para aprovação técnica no PMC passou pelo projeto GMB2NLM

2005 2011 O caminho da GMB para aprovação técnica no PMC passou pelo projeto GMB2NLM 2005 2011 O caminho da GMB para aprovação técnica no PMC passou pelo projeto GMB2NLM Klaus Hartfelder Editor Assistente da GMB editor@gmb.org.br ou klaus@fmrp.usp.br Passo 1: submissão dos dados da revista

Leia mais

Federal Court of Accounts Brazil (TCU) Auditing Climate Change Policies

Federal Court of Accounts Brazil (TCU) Auditing Climate Change Policies Federal Court of Accounts Brazil (TCU) Auditing Climate Change Policies JUNNIUS MARQUES ARIFA Head of Department of Agriculture and Environmental Audit TCU s mandate and jurisdiction 1. Role of Supreme

Leia mais

Universidade da Beira Interior. Sistemas Distribuídos - 2014/2015 Curso: Engª Informática. Folha 11. JAX-RS: Java API for RESTful Web Services

Universidade da Beira Interior. Sistemas Distribuídos - 2014/2015 Curso: Engª Informática. Folha 11. JAX-RS: Java API for RESTful Web Services JAX-RS: Java API for RESTful Web Services A - Creating RESTful Web Services from a Database 1- Comece por criar um projeto do tipo Java Web application, como fez nos exercícios das fichas anteriores. No

Leia mais

manual controle xbox 360 portugues

manual controle xbox 360 portugues manual controle xbox 360 portugues Print and Online Should you be particular with knowing everything about this, you need to find these details. MANUAL CONTROLE XBOX 360 PORTUGUES The following option

Leia mais

APRESENTAÇÃO. ABNT CB-3 Comitê Brasileiro de Eletricidade Comissão de Estudo CE 03:064.01 Instalações Elétricas de Baixa Tensão NBR 5410

APRESENTAÇÃO. ABNT CB-3 Comitê Brasileiro de Eletricidade Comissão de Estudo CE 03:064.01 Instalações Elétricas de Baixa Tensão NBR 5410 APRESENTAÇÃO ABNT CB-3 Comitê Brasileiro de Eletricidade Comissão de Estudo CE 03:064.01 Instalações Elétricas de Baixa Tensão NBR 5410 Instalações elétricas de baixa tensão NBR 5410:1997 NBR 5410:2004

Leia mais

A. Situação / Situation

A. Situação / Situation A. Situação / Situation A Assembleia Mundial da Saúde (OMS) aprova em 1969 o Regulamento Sanitário Internacional, revisto pela quarta vez em 2005. Esta última versão entrou em vigor no plano internacional

Leia mais

A Aviação no Comércio Europeu de Licenças de Emissão Especificidades para pequenos emissores

A Aviação no Comércio Europeu de Licenças de Emissão Especificidades para pequenos emissores A Aviação no Comércio Europeu de Licenças de Emissão Especificidades para pequenos emissores Departamento de Alterações Climáticas, Ar e Ruído (DACAR) Divisão de Poluição Atmosférica e Alterações Climáticas

Leia mais

Engenharia de Requisitos. Professor: Dr. Eduardo Santana de Almeida Universidade Federal da Bahia esa@dcc.ufba.br

Engenharia de Requisitos. Professor: Dr. Eduardo Santana de Almeida Universidade Federal da Bahia esa@dcc.ufba.br Engenharia de Requisitos Professor: Dr. Eduardo Santana de Almeida Universidade Federal da Bahia esa@dcc.ufba.br O Documento de Requisitos Introdução The requirements for a system are the descriptions

Leia mais

Perguntas & Respostas

Perguntas & Respostas Perguntas & Respostas 17 de Abril de 2008 Versão Portuguesa 1. O que é uma Certidão Permanente?...4 2. Como posso ter acesso a uma Certidão Permanente?...4 3. Onde posso pedir uma Certidão Permanente?...4

Leia mais

METODOLOGIA DE AVALIAÇÃO DAS STARTUPS DO MIDI TECNOLÓGICO

METODOLOGIA DE AVALIAÇÃO DAS STARTUPS DO MIDI TECNOLÓGICO METODOLOGIA DE AVALIAÇÃO DAS STARTUPS DO MIDI TECNOLÓGICO RESUMO As incubadoras de empresas são ambientes dotados de competência gerencial, técnica e administrativa que impulsionam a promoção do nascimento

Leia mais

Treinamento para Pais Cidadania digital No Nível Fundamental. Parent Academy Digital Citizenship. At Elementary Level

Treinamento para Pais Cidadania digital No Nível Fundamental. Parent Academy Digital Citizenship. At Elementary Level Parent Academy Digital Citizenship At Elementary Level Treinamento para Pais Cidadania digital No Nível Fundamental Pan American School of Bahia March 18 and 29, 2016 Digital Citizenship Modules Cyberbullying

Leia mais

5/10/10. Implementação. Building web Apps. Server vs. client side. How to create dynamic contents?" Client side" Server side"

5/10/10. Implementação. Building web Apps. Server vs. client side. How to create dynamic contents? Client side Server side 5/10/10 Implementação Mestrado em Informática Universidade do Minho! 6! Building web Apps How to create dynamic contents?" Client side" Code runs on the client (browser)" Code runs on a virtual machine

Leia mais

NOVO SISTEMA DE CORREIO ELETRONICO PARA OS DOMINIOS ic.uff.br & dcc.ic.uff.br

NOVO SISTEMA DE CORREIO ELETRONICO PARA OS DOMINIOS ic.uff.br & dcc.ic.uff.br NOVO SISTEMA DE CORREIO ELETRONICO PARA OS DOMINIOS ic.uff.br & dcc.ic.uff.br A partir de 28/07/2004 (quarta-feira), ás 17:30 hs estaremos trocando nossos servidores de correio para ambos os domínios ic.uff.br

Leia mais

Utilizando subversion como controle de versão

Utilizando subversion como controle de versão Utilizando subversion como controle de versão Heitor Rapcinski Este documento descreverá a utilização de subversion como ferramenta de controle de versão mostrando as facilidades da sua utilização para

Leia mais

para que Software www.aker.com.br Produto: Página: 6.0 Introdução O Aker Firewall não vem com Configuração do PPPoE Solução

para que Software www.aker.com.br Produto: Página: 6.0 Introdução O Aker Firewall não vem com Configuração do PPPoE Solução 1 de 6 Introdução O não vem com a opção de configuração através do Control Center, para a utilização de discagem/autenticação via PPPoE. Este documento visa demonstrar como é feita a configuração do PPPoE

Leia mais

manualdepsiquiatriainfant il manual de psiquiatria infantil

manualdepsiquiatriainfant il manual de psiquiatria infantil manualdepsiquiatriainfant il manual de psiquiatria infantil Topic on this manual is about the greatest of those manualdepsiquiatriainfantil manual de psiquiatria infantil might have lots 1000s of different

Leia mais

JULIANO AUGUSTO DE SOUZA OLIVEIRA

JULIANO AUGUSTO DE SOUZA OLIVEIRA UNIVERSIDADE DE RIBEIRÃO PRETO CENTRO DE CIÊNCIAS EXATAS, NATURAIS E TECNOLÓGICAS PÓS-GRADUAÇÃO LATO SENSU EM BANCO DE DADOS JULIANO AUGUSTO DE SOUZA OLIVEIRA IMPLEMENTAÇÃO DE UM SISTEMA DE CONTROLE DE

Leia mais

Semestre do plano de estudos 1

Semestre do plano de estudos 1 Nome UC Inglês CU Name Código UC 6 Curso LEC Semestre do plano de estudos 1 Área científica Gestão Duração Semestral Horas de trabalho 54 ECTS 2 Horas de contacto TP - 22,5 Observações n.a. Docente responsável

Leia mais

2. Execute o arquivo com o comando a seguir: sudo./alfresco-community-4.2.b-installer-linux-x64.bin

2. Execute o arquivo com o comando a seguir: sudo./alfresco-community-4.2.b-installer-linux-x64.bin Neste tutorial vamos realizar a instalação básica do Alfresco em um Servidor Linux. Usamos para este Tutorial o Alfresco CE 4.2 e Linux Ubuntu 12.10 mais o mesmo pode ser similar em diversos Linux baseasos

Leia mais

BIBLIOGRAFIA. Faupel, A. & Sharp, P. (2003). Promoting emotional literacy. Guidelines for schools, local authorities and

BIBLIOGRAFIA. Faupel, A. & Sharp, P. (2003). Promoting emotional literacy. Guidelines for schools, local authorities and RESUMO EXPANDIDO Pode definir-se Literacia Emocional como a capacidade para reconhecer, compreender, expressar e gerir estados emocionais, do próprio e de outras pessoas, existindo associações entre esta

Leia mais

ONLINE SUBMISSION Revisor

ONLINE SUBMISSION Revisor ONLINE SUBMISSION Revisor O Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research é parcialmente financiado por: LOG IN Log In REVISOR Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological O Brazilian Journal Research

Leia mais

Consultoria em Direito do Trabalho

Consultoria em Direito do Trabalho Consultoria em Direito do Trabalho A Consultoria em Direito do Trabalho desenvolvida pelo Escritório Vernalha Guimarães & Pereira Advogados compreende dois serviços distintos: consultoria preventiva (o

Leia mais

Para iniciar um agente SNMP, usamos o comando snmpd. Por padrão, aceita requisições na porta 161 (UDP).

Para iniciar um agente SNMP, usamos o comando snmpd. Por padrão, aceita requisições na porta 161 (UDP). EN3610 Gerenciamento e interoperabilidade de redes Prof. João Henrique Kleinschmidt Prática SNMP 1 MIBs RMON No Linux os arquivos MIB são armazenados no diretório /usr/share/snmp/mibs. Cada arquivo MIB

Leia mais

Para iniciar um agente SNMP, usamos o comando snmpd. Por padrão, aceita requisições na porta 161 (UDP).

Para iniciar um agente SNMP, usamos o comando snmpd. Por padrão, aceita requisições na porta 161 (UDP). EN3610 Gerenciamento e interoperabilidade de redes Prof. João Henrique Kleinschmidt Prática SNMP Net-SNMP (http://www.net-snmp.org) é um conjunto de aplicações usado para implementar SNMPv1, SNMPv2 e SNMPv3.

Leia mais

Prova Oral de Inglês Duração da Prova: 20 a 25 minutos 2013/2014. 1.º Momento. 4 (A), are you a health-conscious person?

Prova Oral de Inglês Duração da Prova: 20 a 25 minutos 2013/2014. 1.º Momento. 4 (A), are you a health-conscious person? Prova Oral de Inglês Duração da Prova: 20 a 25 minutos 2013/2014 GUIÃO A Disciplina: Inglês, Nível de Continuação 11.º ano Domínio de Referência: O Mundo do Trabalho 1.º Momento Intervenientes e Tempos

Leia mais

Revisão do Mapeamento de Processos em Levantamentos Topográficos de Áreas Patrimoniais. Antônio Diego Oliveira de Almeida Ivanildo Barbosa

Revisão do Mapeamento de Processos em Levantamentos Topográficos de Áreas Patrimoniais. Antônio Diego Oliveira de Almeida Ivanildo Barbosa Revisão do Mapeamento de Processos em Levantamentos Topográficos de Áreas Patrimoniais Antônio Diego Oliveira de Almeida Ivanildo Barbosa Instituto Militar de Engenharia - IME CEP 22290-270 - Rio de Janeiro

Leia mais

Figura 1: VHDL - Exemplo de uso do construto generic: componente mult_se_neg com valor default de n=16 bits.

Figura 1: VHDL - Exemplo de uso do construto generic: componente mult_se_neg com valor default de n=16 bits. OBJETIVOS: Projeto de componentes em VHDL. Projeto e simulação de uma biblioteca de componentes em VHDL no ambiente Quartus II Altera para construção de um caminho de dados (ou bloco operacional) e de

Leia mais

MODELOS DE REFERÊNCIA PARA BIBLIOTECAS: a experiência do SIBi/USP

MODELOS DE REFERÊNCIA PARA BIBLIOTECAS: a experiência do SIBi/USP MODELOS DE REFERÊNCIA PARA BIBLIOTECAS: a experiência do SIBi/USP Teresinha das Graças Coletta 1, Maria Helena Di Francisco 2, Fabio Muller Guerrini³, Thyerre de Castro Ramazzi 4 1 Mestrado, Escola de

Leia mais

CMDB no ITIL v3. Miguel Mira da Silva. mms@ist.utl.pt 919.671.425

CMDB no ITIL v3. Miguel Mira da Silva. mms@ist.utl.pt 919.671.425 CMDB no ITIL v3 Miguel Mira da Silva mms@ist.utl.pt 919.671.425 1 CMDB v2 Configuration Management IT components and the services provided with them are known as CI (Configuration Items) Hardware, software,

Leia mais

Heterogeneous multi-core computer architectures and

Heterogeneous multi-core computer architectures and Heterogeneous multi-core computer architectures and Dedicated processing structures for Signal processing applications Nuno Roma Ongoing research! Heterogeneous any-core processing!

Leia mais

Inglês. Guião. Teste Intermédio de Inglês. Parte IV Interação oral em pares. Teste Intermédio

Inglês. Guião. Teste Intermédio de Inglês. Parte IV Interação oral em pares. Teste Intermédio Teste Intermédio de Inglês Parte IV Interação oral em pares Teste Intermédio Inglês Guião Duração do Teste: 10 a 15 minutos De 25.02.2013 a 10.04.2013 9.º Ano de Escolaridade D TI de Inglês Página 1/ 7

Leia mais

LICENCIATURA EM ENG. DE SISTEMAS E INFORMÁTICA Redes e Serviços de Banda Larga. Laboratório 4. OSPF Backbone

LICENCIATURA EM ENG. DE SISTEMAS E INFORMÁTICA Redes e Serviços de Banda Larga. Laboratório 4. OSPF Backbone Laboratório 4 OSPF Backbone Equipamento necessário: Três OmniSwitches Objectivo: Este laboratório tem como objectivo familiarizar os alunos com as configurações RIP em comutadores OmniSwitch. Sintaxe dos

Leia mais

INFORMATION SECURITY IN ORGANIZATIONS

INFORMATION SECURITY IN ORGANIZATIONS INFORMATION SECURITY IN ORGANIZATIONS Ana Helena da Silva, MCI12017 Cristiana Coelho, MCI12013 2 SUMMARY 1. Introduction 2. The importance of IT in Organizations 3. Principles of Security 4. Information

Leia mais

Criando diferenciais competitivos e minimizando riscos com uma boa. Claudio Yamashita Country Manager Intralinks Brasil

Criando diferenciais competitivos e minimizando riscos com uma boa. Claudio Yamashita Country Manager Intralinks Brasil Criando diferenciais competitivos e Informação minimizando riscos com uma boa Governança da Claudio Yamashita Country Manager Intralinks Brasil PESQUISA GLOBAL DE SEGURANÇA DA INFORMAÇÃO 2014 - EY Pensando

Leia mais

Course Computer Science Academic year 2012/2013 Subject Social Aspects of Computers ECTS 5

Course Computer Science Academic year 2012/2013 Subject Social Aspects of Computers ECTS 5 Course Computer Science Academic year 2012/2013 Subject Social Aspects of Computers ECTS 5 Type of course Compulsory Year 2º Semester 2nd sem Student Workload: Professor(s) Natalia Gomes, Ascensão Maria

Leia mais

Protective circuitry, protective measures, building mains feed, lighting and intercom systems

Protective circuitry, protective measures, building mains feed, lighting and intercom systems Tecnologia de instalações electrónicas Training systems / trainers for electrical wiring/building management systems: Protective circuitry, protective measures, building mains feed, lighting and intercom

Leia mais

NCE/10/00806 Decisão de apresentação de pronúncia - Novo ciclo de estudos

NCE/10/00806 Decisão de apresentação de pronúncia - Novo ciclo de estudos NCE/10/00806 Decisão de apresentação de pronúncia - Novo ciclo de estudos NCE/10/00806 Decisão de apresentação de pronúncia - Novo ciclo de estudos Decisão de Apresentação de Pronúncia ao Relatório da

Leia mais

SAP Best Practices Informações sobre disponibilidade e download para Clientes SAP e Parceiros SAP. Know-how setorial e global pré-configurado

SAP Best Practices Informações sobre disponibilidade e download para Clientes SAP e Parceiros SAP. Know-how setorial e global pré-configurado SAP Best Practices Informações sobre disponibilidade e download para Clientes SAP e Parceiros SAP Know-how setorial e global pré-configurado Índice 1.Disponibilidade dos pacotes SAP Best Practices 2.Efetuar

Leia mais

ESTRUTURA DE CAPITAL: UMA ANÁLISE EM EMPRESAS SEGURADORAS

ESTRUTURA DE CAPITAL: UMA ANÁLISE EM EMPRESAS SEGURADORAS ESTRUTURA DE CAPITAL: UMA ANÁLISE EM EMPRESAS SEGURADORAS THE CAPITAL STRUCTURE: AN ANALYSE ON INSURANCE COMPANIES FREDERIKE MONIKA BUDINER METTE MARCO ANTÔNIO DOS SANTOS MARTINS PAULA FERNANDA BUTZEN

Leia mais

Base de Dados na Amazônia. Laurindo Campos MCT/INPA

Base de Dados na Amazônia. Laurindo Campos MCT/INPA Base de Dados na Amazônia Laurindo Campos MCT/INPA Workshop GLOBIO 3 Rio de Janeiro - RJ 24-26 de março de 2009 Princípios Fundamentais - RIB Compartilhamento de dados Provedores de dados controlam o acesso

Leia mais

Laboratório 3. Base de Dados II 2008/2009

Laboratório 3. Base de Dados II 2008/2009 Laboratório 3 Base de Dados II 2008/2009 Plano de Trabalho Lab. 3: Programação em Transact-SQL MYSQL Referências www.mysql.com MICROSOFT SQL SERVER - Procedimentos do Lado do Servidor (Stored Procedures)

Leia mais

DPI. Núcleo de Apoio ao Desenvolvimento de Projetos e Internacionalização Project Development And Internationalization Support Office

DPI. Núcleo de Apoio ao Desenvolvimento de Projetos e Internacionalização Project Development And Internationalization Support Office DPI Núcleo de Apoio ao Desenvolvimento de Projetos e Internacionalização Project Development And Internationalization Support Office Apresentação/Presentation Criado em 1 de março de 2011, o Núcleo de

Leia mais

Normalização e interoperabilidade da informação geográfica

Normalização e interoperabilidade da informação geográfica Normalização e interoperabilidade da informação geográfica perspetivas para a formação em Engenharia Geográfica João Catalão Departamento de Engenharia Geográfica, Geofísica e Energia Faculdade de Ciências

Leia mais

The Brazil United States Consumer Product Safety Conference Brazil United States Joint Press Statement June 10, 2011 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Common Interests Ensuring a high level of consumer product safety

Leia mais

WATER MATTRESS MASSAGE SYSTEM 20439

WATER MATTRESS MASSAGE SYSTEM 20439 Page 1 of 10 WATER MATTRESS MASSAGE SYSTEM 20439 CONTENTS Massage System with Controller Please note: the above image shows a white unit and a blue unit. The white unit is supplied inside the blue unit

Leia mais

BR-EMS MORTALITY AND SUVIVORSHIP LIFE TABLES BRAZILIAN LIFE INSURANCE AND PENSIONS MARKET

BR-EMS MORTALITY AND SUVIVORSHIP LIFE TABLES BRAZILIAN LIFE INSURANCE AND PENSIONS MARKET BR-EMS MORTALITY AND SUVIVORSHIP LIFE TABLES BRAZILIAN LIFE INSURANCE AND PENSIONS MARKET 2015 1 e-mail:mario@labma.ufrj.br Tables BR-EMS, mortality experience of the Brazilian Insurance Market, were constructed,

Leia mais

Laboratório 5. Base de Dados II 2008/2009

Laboratório 5. Base de Dados II 2008/2009 Laboratório 5 Base de Dados II 2008/2009 Plano de Trabalho Lab. 4: Programação em Transact-SQL Referências MICROSOFT SQL SERVER - Triggers (gatilhos). - Exercícios 1. Conceito. - Os Stored Procedures permitem

Leia mais

PREFEITURA MUNICIPAL DE BOM DESPACHO-MG PROCESSO SELETIVO SIMPLIFICADO - EDITAL

PREFEITURA MUNICIPAL DE BOM DESPACHO-MG PROCESSO SELETIVO SIMPLIFICADO - EDITAL CADERNO DE PROVAS 1 A prova terá a duração de duas horas, incluindo o tempo necessário para o preenchimento do gabarito. 2 Marque as respostas no caderno de provas, deixe para preencher o gabarito depois

Leia mais